Localization Academy

How I Started Transcend Translation with Cyle Adair

Business is important, but remember that it is not the only thing in life! With this mindset, Cyle found the balance he wanted between work, family, and friendship. Learn about the journey and life experiences of Cyle Adair, founder of Transcend Translation.

Welcome to a new episode of our series “How I Started”, where we will focus on founders of different localization businesses.

In this episode, join us as Cyle shares:

  • His experiences growing up in multiple cultures and the understanding he gained
  • The approach to building deep, lasting connections with others
  • Lessons from his time in Argentina and serving in the army
  • His transition from banking to the translation business
  • The key trait he values in new employees at Transcend Translation
  • Tips for helping people feel comfortable around you
  • How to handle and learn from mistakes

Andrej Zito 

So, how would a see let’s get started? Maybe for starters, let’s start with some very basic questions. Where are you from? Where are you located right now?

Cyle Adair 

You say that’s a basic question. So I am located right now and Salt Lake City, Utah. And that’s where our headquarters of our company is as well to obviously, where am I from? That’s a long, that’s a longer answer. I, my dad was in the Marines for 24 years. So I’ve I’ve grown up all over the world. I was born well, almost born in Scotland, actually. That’s where my family was living. I actually ended up being born in Reno, Nevada. And then we moved from there to Twentynine Palms, California, then we moved from there to Oklahoma, then from there to Chicago, then to DC, then to Okinawa, Japan, and then San Diego, then Oklahoma. And then, and that’s where I graduated from high school was in Oklahoma. So quite a bit of moving around.

Andrej Zito 

A lot of travel.

Cyle Adair 

Yeah. And then, you know, I went to school out here, I’m actually in Utah to Brigham Young University. And then after my freshman year, I decided that I wanted to go on a church mission for our church, and went down to Argentina for two years. So I was there for two years, came back. And then for work during the summers, I was out working, I worked for ADT, like the home security systems. I went out and worked in Virginia, that first summer and then the next summer was out in kind of Minneapolis, St. Paul area the following summer. And then the third summer between my junior and senior year, I went to I want an internship competition at the Marriott School of Business. And that took me down to Southern California and worked for a commercial real estate company. So work there. And then I was doing Army ROTC my whole way through college. And then I went to Oklahoma for some training. So when I graduated from college, I commissioned as an officer, and for my initial training, went to Oklahoma, then after that, went to Fort Benning, Georgia, and did Airborne School was jumping out of airplanes with parachutes. Then after that I was got to my, you know, duty station is what they call it, Fort Hood, Texas, which is a little bit north of Austin, Texas. Then I went on deployment to Iraq for a year, came back home for a year, little over a year, went on another deployment to Iraq for a year, then came back home. And then I transitioned out of the military at that point, had done almost five years in transition, joined with Fortune 500 company out in Indianapolis, and then moved out here to Utah after a little over a year after that. So where I’m from, like I said that as a longer story, I’ve lived a little bit of everywhere it feels like which actually I love because rarely it feels like there’s a major city that I go to, or I wouldn’t say country, but a major city that I don’t go to here in the United States that I feel like I don’t know, somebody that I can call somebody up and you’ll meet them up for lunch, dinner a lot of times, you know, stay at their place, depending on where I’m going and what’s going on there. So one thing that I’ve loved

Andrej Zito 

Okay, so that was life of Cyle in… I dont know, 3 minutes?. But but let’s let’s try to break it down a little bit. We can walk slowly. Like to me it was interesting already that even as a young Cyle, you were traveling a lot. Do you see that as a as a good thing? Or did you ever feel as a child that? I don’t know? Like you had friends and then you had to move away and find new friends

Cyle Adair 

No, so yeah… I think everybody has different perspective. So like my wife, for example, she lived in one city in one place her whole entire life. So it’s a very different like, as we mold our worlds together being married, you know, we actually just this past weekend on the 12th We are sorry. Yeah, on the 12th we sell it celebrated our 12 year anniversary wedding anniversary. So thank you. So yeah, for me, I’ve always looked at it as like a big positive. I will say there’s a big difference because I am a extrovert and so I don’t mind going and meeting new people. So that’s completely fine with me. And that’s part of the adventure and part of the fun. A lot of ways so was hard leaving people when I was little, you know, my best friend when I was, you know, in first grade, moving from DC out to Japan. Yeah, I mean a little bit, but at the same time, I was like, Oh, I get to go make more friends. And honestly, as I matured, I was like that as a big benefit of like, Oh, I get to go make more friends and the really cool thing. I really realized that when I was in college, were different college, different internships, different opportunities were happening in different cities. And that’s where I was like, oh, St. Louis, that’d be cool. Oh, my friend John lives there. Oh, San Diego. That’d be cool. I used to live there. Oh la area where I went did an internship. That’s only an hour away and oh, I’ve got all these other friends that I’ve known that they’ve moved out there, and they’re going to school out there or whatever. So it really I feel like worked out for my good. And I’m, I’m super grateful for it.

Andrej Zito 

Did you ever feel that the friendships that you were building in these different places could be called a deep relationship, like a deep connection? Because right now I’m in the Vancouver, Canada, and a lot of the people like immigrants who come here, then they say that the Vancouver people are very close to foreigners, and that most of their like deep connections are with people that they grew up with that they know from high school. So like they are very nice to you. Like they say the polite thing and say, how are you? They can chit chat. But there’s nothing deep. Did you? Did you feel like you were building those deeper connections with people? Or was it just like, hey, I know, John, because we spent, I don’t know, one year, two years together, and I can call him but would you define those relationships as deep?

Cyle Adair 

I would say they feel for me, they are, they are deep. I mean, obviously, they’re superficial relationships that you have. But I mean, for me going back, particularly to my best friend in Japan, John Crawshaw, he actually lives here in Utah. Now we’re about an hour away from each other. And at least once a year, we get our families together. And he’s very much into football. And so we get together and do a football game. And then we’re texting each other about different news that we hear about football. And actually, I was just with my brother two months ago, and his older brother and my brother were best friends, too. And so we took a picture, and we, you know, sent it over to him. And he said, Oh, you know, like, it just reminds me of the good days, you know, seeing you guys together. So I truly feel like like, those are deep relationships, my best friend, David Brundage, when I lived in San Diego, I mean, we still stay in contact all the time. He’s a general contractor up in, in Portland, Oregon now, and he was actually in town. And so we met up and grab lunch the last time that he was able to be in town. So I think these are very real relationships, you know, does that mean that we talk every single week or every single month? No, you know, I would say no, but I think they genuinely know like, anytime, if they’re going to be close, or anything that reminds them of them, they their texts away, or a quick phone call away, and we can just catch up. So I think they’re they’re very genuine relationships. But there are plenty of relationships, that it’s like, oh, I kind of know them. And we live together. But we only hung out a handful of times. And yeah, my calling or texting them. If I’m ever coming into town. I don’t know. It just depends on what’s going on. You know,

Andrej Zito 

this may sound may be strange to you. But are you trying to be maybe a little bit systematic about keeping in touch with people like, I don’t know, like, every month or every two months, you call up someone? Or is it really just like randomly, like, if somebody you think about someone or something happens related to the person, you get in touch with them,

Cyle Adair 

I think just for my personality and how I am like, I genuinely feel bad when I’m like, Oh my gosh, did a whole year just go past by. And that was the last time I text them or last time that we were texting. So there’s definitely that. But I think that’s happens to everybody. And I just tried to get over it. Is it systematic? No. Do you know what I say that, you know, it’s funny, Andre, one of my goals this year, is to be in better contact with more of my friends. And so actually, I have something set on my calendar on Tuesday afternoons as a reminder, to call or texts a friend just to reach out. So that’s probably the most systematic, I do know some people that they have a whole CRM setup, and contacts in there. And it tells them like who to call when to stop. And for me, I’m like, I’m not quite there. And that’s I don’t think I’ll ever get there that for me, I don’t feel like not to say that they’re fake. I appreciate that. They’re that organized that way they want to do that. But so when I compare that to MI systematic, of like a reminder on here to, you know, once a week to go, Hey, you should probably reach out to some friends and it doesn’t matter. It doesn’t don’t say what friends or what family members or whatever. Sometimes it’s reaching out to an uncle or a cousin and just being like, Hey, how’s life? What’s going on? You know, and so it’s all over the board.

Andrej Zito 

I still think it’s better than I would say most of the people and I’m just talking based on my experience, usually, maybe when it comes to work relationships, you know, when people move on from a company, they say, yeah, we’ll keep in touch but in my experience, they usually never do. But at least like if you have a reminder, maybe you are going to think of someone and then actually take some action. So I think that’s pretty, pretty good.

Cyle Adair 

No, I think I really love and again, it’s probably my wife calls me an extra extrovert actually. And so and she’s not even an introvert She’s probably just, she’s an extrovert but not like well, extrovert calls me an extra extra because I love connecting with people for me that is so fulfilling in life is to connect with somebody to understand them and they understand me and to know that they have my back and I got their back and just genuinely relationships. For me that is one of the most fulfilling things in life.

Andrej Zito 

I’m going to ask about that because previously asked you about the deeper connections and since you like connecting with people, sometimes I Ask people like about their tips, or I don’t know, guidelines on how you can connect with someone, especially on a deeper level if you just need them. Because like I was mentioning before, you know, like a lot of the people that you meet sometimes strangers right away, if you go to conferences or I don’t know, a sports club, the first discussions are very kind of like, Hey, how’s the winter with with Eli? Why did you watch something like that? How you bring the I don’t know, let’s say the first contact to a more deeper level? like where you really feel connected to the person.  So probably about three, four years ago, I took a deep dive thinking about that quite a bit. And I’ve changed my I feel like the way I am. Do I still have superficial conversations with people? Absolutely. From time to time, like, you know, some random guy you see at the gym or something like that, like, Oh, hey, how’s it going? Oh, good. Yeah, everything good? Yeah, you know, it’s a real quick kind of interaction. But people that are there, you know, sometimes for networking events, some things, you know, other non related things, if I go, I want to actually really get to know somebody, I just don’t want to know something, the very first rule that I have in my mind is, don’t ask them, what they do for work are their profession. And me, don’t tell them don’t bring it up, like, oh, I work in a translation company, I have a translation company, don’t bring up work, because at least and again, I’m probably going to stereotype but for for most men, they relate who they are as their career. And I get that that’s very well tied, because you spend eight hours or more or sometimes less, depending on what’s going on doing that, you know, so I totally get that. But if you really want to get to know somebody, it’s not about their career, because most people can talk about their professions all day long. So I try to avoid those things of talking about career. The other thing that I tried to do is start asking some really deep questions, which you can’t really say at the right at the beginning, but you can kind of get to know them. Oh, great. How long have you been married for you know how many kids you got? Oh, that’s great. Hey, I’ve got a important question that I’m still trying to figure out. What would you say makes you feel alive? I love asking that question. What makes you feel alive? And you’re going to hear all different answers of people. The first I usually if you’re not a good example of like, when you go, maybe I went too deep too quickly, is people will, you know, go like, Oh, I don’t know, you know, and they just look like shocked like I didn’t, where I didn’t know, we were getting to that level of our conversation. But a lot of people, if you’ve kind of warm things up a little bit, in my opinion of like, I’m trying to figure out life, you seem like you’re somebody that’s got life figured out in a lot of ways. You know, that’s what do you do? Like, how, what makes you feel alive? What are you passionate about things like that? Sadly, I’d be shocked. You know, I’m shocked when so many people bring up their profession so quickly of like, what are you passionate about? And they’re like, I’m passionate about my work. And I get there’s a lot of people like that. But I’m like, I know, there’s more to them than that. And so that’s what I want to figure out. And so I asked a lot more questions about, you know, other things other than work, you know, because when it’s all said and done, I like to think I don’t have life figured out by any means. But I like to think I do understand there’s a lot more to life. And so when I’m sitting there on my deathbed, I’m not going to be talking about translation, no offense, you know, I’m going to be talking about most likely relationships and connections that I’ve had meaningful things in life, and work, I will say, you know, I’ll probably think of and go, Hey, that’s great that I was able to, you know, build this company and the amazing people that helped, you know, helped all along the way to build that and and the sacrifices that they made and, and, you know, just the relationship, like, I feel like just the efforts that we had to build something together. Like, I think passionately about those things. I think that’s great. But it’s not translation. That could be in a sense, any business for that matter. Well, I might ask you that question later on, maybe? All right, what makes you feel alive? But for now, I’m actually curious because you mentioned that you went into this deep dive three years ago, what was the spark for that? Like, why did you even go that route?

Cyle Adair 

So my, my best friend, shout out Devin Peterson. But Devin Peterson, we, we just and I’ll tell you what, like, we were good friends. And that’s really what it was, we were good friends. And then it kind of turned into we knew each other deeper. And we started talking a little bit more about like, what we’re good at and what we’re not good at, and our fears a little bit more and being more vulnerable in that aspect. You know, and and then we started realizing like, man, we’re really clicking like, this is great. Like, I know him in a lot of ways. And he shared he said, Hey, we you should read this book. I just got done with it. And it’s eye opening. And it’s called Wild at Heart. Okay. And basically, it’s written by like a Christian author that talks about three specific things that men need They need a beauty to go after they needed an adventure to go on. And I’m blanking out on the third one right now. But anyways, he said, So I read the book too. And I was like, Man, that was really good. Like, I think that’s right. I think that sounds right. I think most men like our DNA. That’s what we want. Like, those are some of the driving forces for us. And so he, we were messaging or we actually we were talking and he said, Hey, there’s a like a boot camp for this stuff. I said, a boot camp. And he’s like, yeah, he’s like, I looked on the back of that book, and it mentioned this, and there’s a website, so I looked it up. There’s this boot camp. And so I was like, well, that’s cool. And he goes, you’ll never guess there’s 130 minutes away from our house this year. And I was like, Are you kidding me? He was like, yeah, it’s up in one ship, Utah. They have him all over the United States, apparently. But there’s one, only 30 minutes away, I thought we were gonna have to go to like Denver, Colorado, or wherever for this. And so I was like, well, that’s, that’s kind of cool. And then out of the blue. He just says, Hey, man, you need to get work off or you need to figure out something. You’re gonna be gone for this Thursday, and this Friday. Oh, okay. All right, man. That’s cool. All right. And we showed up, he comes, picks me up and he tells me what’s going on. He’s like, Hey, I got our boot camp tickets. I paid for it. Don’t worry about it, we’re going to this thing. And I’m like, Alright, so we go up there for they do it twice a year. And it was a total eye opening experience for me about the and it goes a little bit deeper in the book, but they go like 10 different kind of levels. And I’m never forget, I met this guy, Robbie, who literally was just messaging with him yesterday. And his him and his new wife are just celebrating their one year anniversary, actually. But Robbie, I remember sitting next to him. And again, these were all strangers besides my friend. And there’s probably 120 different guys there. And he and I go, Hey, you know what, what brought you up here? And he goes, Yeah, you know, I read the book while back and he goes, he says, this is like my third boot camp. And I like third boot camp. I think you just come once and it’s like there, you know, or when he was like, oh, no, man. He’s like, if you think you got stuff figured out like you’re better than I am, you know, because this is my third boot camp. And I was like, Okay, well, what do you like best about it. I mean, I’ve been there for a day at that point. He goes, I like the vow of silence. Now the vow of silence is they’ll teach something. And then for the next 45 minutes or so, you set yourself apart. This is out in like the beautiful mountains of Utah here. And you can go out into the kind of the wilderness and you got the next 45 minutes to an hour or so to think ponder, write in a journal. It’s time for silence, though it’s not time to like, Hey, let’s go talk and network and get to know other people and stuff like that. And it’s time to just focus. And he says, I come up here for the valet silence. And I said, and I said to him, I said, you spend x amount of dollars to come up to this boot camp, to live in silence. Is that right? And he was like, Yeah, that’s right. And funny enough, at the end of the boot camp, and what I can say as well, too. Absolutely, I pay that much to go be in silence, like it’s a crazy thing. So when we talk about these deeper dives, that really opened me up. And actually, I have a group of friends that again, we were all strangers. And there’s a group of 10 of us that were really close. We call ourselves the band of brothers now. And we’re messaging each other almost on a daily basis, we’re very vulnerable with each other of what we do. Well, what we don’t do well, and it’s not, we rarely talk about work, we rarely talk about work, even though it does get brought up because a lot of them are entrepreneur entrepreneurs as well, too. But it just really helped me kind of take that deeper dive to go there’s a lot more. And I thought it was so unique. They never set any game plans or game rules. But I realized with so many of them, because I genuinely wanted to get to know them as a person. I we got done. And we’re like swapping phone numbers and stuff like that. And, and it hit me after boot camp. And we’re like, Hey, we should all go grab some dinner together and like just meet up and they’re like, Yeah, that’s great. So we meet up almost on a monthly basis to either go grab dinner, or usually to do some kind of adventure. The last adventure that we did is indoor rock climbing. But we do all sorts of stuff we’ve done, we’ve built hatchets, you know, out of metal, like we were blacksmith doing it. We do all these different little ventures like every once awhile just to like, and it helps us feel alive a little bit more, you know of that. But ultimately, I realized when I left bootcamp three plus years ago, I’m like, I’m gonna go meet up with these guys. I don’t even know half of their occupations. It never got brought up. And for me, that was like the switch of going, okay. If I want to get to know somebody, it’s not talking about work. It’s going to be talking about deeper things, you know, and, and that’s what I got to talk to them a little bit about and feel like I know them all very, very well, at this point.

Andrej Zito 

Did you think about going back to the bootcamp? Yeah.

Cyle Adair 

Every six months that pops up, I’m going oh, can I figure out to make work and get get out there and go do that? Robbie still goes in fact, Robbie has been now a guest speaker at the bootcamp which is amazing. And I think he’s probably now at like, seven or eight times now, and he’s brought his dad and brother and other people. And he’s just an amazing individual. And so yeah, I definitely want to go again, I need to look at, there’s just the bootcamp this last month or actually two, three weeks ago, but I was away on a family vacation, so I wasn’t able to make it. But yeah, definitely that boot camp is still on my list. In fact, there’s a boot camp up in Alaska, that me and a bunch of the band of brothers were talking about like, Hey, should we go to the Alaska one? Should we figure that out? And like, go make that happen? I mean, it’s a lot more time off work a lot more money, but should we go do it, you know, so that’s definitely under consideration.

Andrej Zito 

One of my ex colleague, he was very into spiritual things. And he used to go to these silent retreats, I’m not sure how it’s officially called, I think it’s a place where you go for almost a one week, and you get some basic food, you get some basic clothes, and you don’t speak the whole time for one week. So I think what you guys had was like a smaller version of that. But what I’m wondering is, especially since you’re the extra extrovert, how were you coping with the silence, like what was going on through your head

Cyle Adair 

will be this was, I will say, this was more of like a Christian based boot camp, that you believe in God, or at least a higher power, all different kinds of religions and faiths there, I would say, but overall, it was more that it was more talking Bible verses were definitely used quite a bit as well, too. But it was more of like, Hey, if you want to be the best dad, if you want to be the best husband. And that’s what kind of this book talks about a little bit. And this boot camp, there’s kind of 10 sessions, I guess you could say, and so they’d go over one concept, and then someone would present on it and talk about that. And, you know, the people would be talking in the crowd, I guess, a little bit as well, too. But then after they were done, it was like a challenge. Now I want you to go ponder, pray, journal, talk with God, go, go figure that out a little bit more of what that looks like in your life. And so over four days, you’re doing these 10 different sessions, you know, and doing a couple of them are a few of them per day of those sessions to kind of figure that out a little bit more. So for me, it was sometimes being in my own thoughts in my mind isn’t great, because it’s like, I’m always staying busy with something. But it was very refreshing. And it was a time that I felt like I was probably closer to God, one of the closer times that I felt like I’m closer to God, and figuring out stuff, just figuring out stuff. Like, it doesn’t mean I have it figured out. But it’s like, how does that work within me? How do I use that in my life? How do I how does that make me a better husband? How can I implement that a lot of different things that I wrote down and journaled and tried to figure out and feel like, I’m at least one step closer to figuring out a better life.

Andrej Zito 

So when you are with your friends, or I don’t know, even with your co workers, do you have trouble staying? I don’t know, silent? Do you? Do you have to be always extroverted? Or do you give space to other people? I will I assume that you too. That was maybe a stupid question. But like, how much do you feel inside of you? Like, hey, I want to talk now. But maybe then your brain kicks in like, hey, maybe you should just let other people talk.

Cyle Adair 

That’s probably a perfect, perfect explanation for I think, just because that’s how I’m built or whatever, I probably always, always have something to say or something that add or really, I really enjoy asking questions, and then just letting people figure it out. I mean,

Andrej Zito 

honestly, if you should start a podcast, I

Cyle Adair 

was about to say, I would actually love to switch switch roles in that aspect, because I love learning. And I just feel like I’m genuinely interested about people. You know, I’ve got one employee who’s very young, you know, I tell them all the time, I have so much to learn from him. And it’s not because he’s got all life figured out. He’s got he’s got different perspectives and different ideas, and I’m genuinely interested of like, he’s got some stuff figured out that I don’t, and I’d love to understand that a little bit more. So yeah, I think it’s my brain that kicks in to be like, hey, stop asking questions. Hey, stop talking. And let it just let things just be let people because if they’re not an extrovert, maybe introverts more a little bit more quiet. And maybe they would say something, but they want to have that break there to kind of go, Oh, can I talk now I don’t want to like, impose, you know, and obviously they’re not going to be imposing to do that.

Andrej Zito 

Where do you think this whole thing about being extrovert or introvert comes from new thing? It’s really genes or is it how you were brought up or

Cyle Adair 

thought about that? A little bit? Definitely don’t have it figured out. My mom is an extrovert. My dad is actually an introvert but he is. And I’ve actually read some things on that that I can’t remember exactly, but my dad is a very, you would never guess you’d meet him and you think that he’s an extrovert, but he’s truly an introvert. He’s just very good with people. So I don’t know where exactly came from, I think everybody’s a little bit different. I would say probably the majority actually now thinking about it, I think all my siblings, I’ve got two older sisters and older brother, they would all be listed as extroverts. But my older sister, actually, both my sisters, they’re avid readers, and they love to just go sneak away and go cool, you guys are having fun, I’m gonna have fun too, and go read a book. But the at the same time, they love to come down and chat and play games aren’t like that. So more on the side of extrovert. But, you know, I don’t know, I don’t know if that has anything to do with it. I don’t, I don’t think they raised us a certain way to be extroverts. But I will go back to, you know, being in the military, when you move all the time. You can be an introvert, you can, again, nothing negative on it. But you can for me either side as I can be closed off and just go, I don’t have any friends who’s going to come talk to me, or it’s like, go out there and just go make yourself available and go make some friends because no one’s going to be coming to you to figure that out.

Andrej Zito 

So what is actually your definition of an extrovert? Because so far to me, it sounds like very late related to being good or interacting with people. But I asked a lot of people on this podcast about this. And we came up with different definitions.

Cyle Adair 

Yeah, my definition of it and maybe doesn’t sound like what I was explaining. But my definition of an extrovert is energized. By being around other people. An introvert is energy or it is when they’re around other people it, it kind of sucks that out of them a little bit. That’s probably at least for me, the biggest definition of it of what does that do, but it doesn’t. But a lot of times I think people and sometimes even generally speaking, it’s like, oh, an extrovert is really good at talking to people is louder is whatever it is, you know, I think those are characteristics. But when it comes down to it, I think that’s probably the best definition I can give. What what yeah, what would you say?

Andrej Zito 

No, exactly the same one, at least like from what I heard other people say like, this is the definition that I would probably agree with. But then my actually follow up question would be especially for you, are there any people despite the fact that you are extrovert who actually drain your energy? Or is it always a positive one?

Cyle Adair 

No, no, I have found this out. And this is one of my like, our mantra, like one of their biggest mantra is, and it’s 100%, before someone gets hired, they need to explain this to me. And they have to know this very clearly. And what I say is care, like I care, you need to care about the clients, you need to care about your co workers just as much as I do years ago. And when I was still in language translation companies, there are going to be issues with projects. And what I realized is sometimes I’d get really upset with a project manager when they screwed something up. And other times I wouldn’t, and I thought, Well, why, like, why am I just bipolar? That I’m feeling bad that day? So I’m gonna go take it out on him and go, what happened? Why would you do would you mess up, and other times they go, oh, man, that happened. Let’s figure it out and make sure we don’t have that happen again in the future. And so as I looked at it, and that’s why I was able to come up with that, what I realized is, I’m okay with people making mistakes. Now, obviously, we don’t want them to have it be the same mistake over and over again. But I’m okay with people making mistakes, because I make mistakes. And oh, as well to what I’m not okay with is when people make mistakes, and they don’t care. If they’re like, that doesn’t matter. Anyways, I realized that actually makes me very upset. And those are people very clearly that I do not want to work with. Because I know one it’s extremely draining for me. And it makes me Yeah, I just I don’t have as much patience with those individuals. But people are like, Man, I made this mistake. This is what I did. I’m sorry about it. This is kind of my game plan. So hopefully it doesn’t happen again. Can we rewrite? You know, I’m on the business sense we look at? Do we need to update our SOPs and our documentation, our steps, anything else that we need to improve? I love that I have no problems when we make, you know, errors in that in that aspect. Because I’d love to see a company that is perfect at that or a person that is I just don’t think there is but I’m okay with people making mistakes. I’m just not okay, if they don’t care.

Andrej Zito 

When was the last time that this happened to you?

Cyle Adair 

Thankfully, within transcend, it’s never happened. I can’t express enough. I Oh, yeah. You mentioned the LinkedIn posts that I did, you know, just the other day and naming some of the employees that I have, like, I genuinely love and just respect so much of the people that I work with, because we all see eye to eye because they’re the ones saying just as loudly as I am of, hey, I need you to care about this situation in this client. Just as much as I do. Or this I need you to care. Good example. locash just having this baby you know and having his first baby Hey, guys, we need to pitch in together. This is teamwork time guys. I need you to care about location make sure that he can be with his family for the next two weeks. And enjoy that time. And that precious time of being a brand new dad, we need to kick it all into gear. And we all understand that. And that’s what we’re all doing and working towards. So it hasn’t been at this organization, it’s been several years ago. And that’s again, it wasn’t until actually after I left that organization, and just dissecting a little bit more of like, Why was I so upset sometimes with one project manager, or one situation and then not on another one, and then figuring that out. And that was probably about four years ago, when I figured that out,

Andrej Zito 

we are jumping a little bit ahead, because I still want to talk a little bit more about like, you know, your childhood and your teenage years. But since we’re talking about this, do you have any way how you evaluate if people are going to care as much as you do when you hire them, or harder, you know,

Cyle Adair 

I’m gonna say a little bit of luck, actually, I mean, I talk about it. And I’m really clear with them on that. And I say, hey, if this doesn’t resound with you, if this is not, like, if you want to just come to work, punch in, punch out, get your paycheck, live in for the weekend kind of stuff, I just tell them, I just don’t think this would be a good relationship, I don’t think this is going to be a place that you’re going to enjoy. Because that’s not the culture here. And and so I’ve had some, and I just asked him at that point, kind of in the interview of like, you tell me, what does this resound with you? And most of the time, every once awhile, it gets someone to be like, oh, yeah, and I can tell from their doubt in their voice that I’m like, Hey, it’s okay. Like, I don’t look bad on you or like that. I just don’t think it’s a good fit. I don’t think I’m better than you. I don’t think anything like that. I just think it’s not going to be a good fit. So let’s say both of our times, if it’s not like 100% imprinted in your mind, and they’re like, Yeah, I mean, maybe I am looking for a little bit more of like, just living for the weekend, or, you know, a good paycheck. And I love those people. And I always start out every single interview, I always say, hey, just let you know, I might be interviewing you, you’re you’re interviewing me just as much, or probably even more, what I hope is, is that we can find a good fit. If there is then fantastic. If there isn’t, let’s let’s move on, that’s completely fine, you know, but the only way that we can figure that out is if you’re honest with me and yourself. And if I’m doing the same, if we do that, we’re going to figure this thing out pretty quickly. On the other hand, if it’s not a good fit, we’re going to figure it out as well, too, which is completely fine. But why we’re supposed to both of our times. And so it works out pretty good in that aspect. Because people, I feel like they let down their guard a little bit more to be them and go, yeah, that fits in line with who I am or no, that doesn’t fit in line with who I am. So and then going back to that question of like, I state that very clearly of like, This is who we are. And then I say help me understand maybe a time that you felt like that or seen that. And usually pretty quickly, they can think of a time and the times that they can’t and they’re like, Oh, I just yeah, that’s just where I see it I then I can tell maybe it doesn’t bug them as much, or maybe they haven’t figured it out. But for the most part, it’s probably a decent indicator that maybe they don’t feel that way all the way. So I would love to, you know, honestly spend some more time thinking and figuring out how can I do that? Because there’s definitely some luck involved where I believe people when they’re like, No, that’s exactly how I feel. Yeah, I had one coworker that this happened. And I was just like, Why in the world, aren’t they Karen like, this bugged me so much. And then I went to my boss, and my boss didn’t really care. And I realized, like, this sucks, like how in the world, you know? And so those people aren’t going, Okay, we’re on the same. We’re on the same page. You know,

Andrej Zito 

I want to go back still to your early years, because you were moving a lot. Did you as a child, were you aware, especially like, when you move to Japan, like of the different culture? Or was it for you as a younger person that you are just I don’t know, hanging out with kids your age, and it was the same?

Cyle Adair 

I mean, I didn’t really recognize or see it, I will say, so. One, my dad being in the military for 24 years in the Marines. And then also me being in the military, it was so interesting, because I was able to look at and go, Why am I the way that I am? There’s so many different reasons why how you brought up your beliefs, your parents, and all these other things. But one of the things that I always thought that was interesting in the military, which I think is pretty unique, is when I was in of seeing this in particular. And again, this might be controversial in a lot of ways of how people think, or I might offend them and if that’s how it is too bad, but I never really saw race. I didn’t see even religions, you know, like I saw everybody is just an individual as a person. And yes, that might help me if it’s like, oh, they’re Jewish. So yeah, they don’t do Christmas, but they do another you know, celebration, Hanukkah during that time. So I saw those different things. was as I grew up, and I didn’t really recognize, I just knew that, oh, that’s different. And that’s completely fine. I didn’t think it was better, I didn’t think it was worse. I just saw that as different. Also being the military, I’ll say this when we lived in Japan, I was seven to 10 years old. And I will say, because we were military, we went to a US based school. And so the far majority of people I was dealing with were still Americans. But on the weekends, me and my brother, we’d go off base, and we’d go to the all the different Japanese shops. And we learned a little bit of Japanese. I mean, we were learning Japanese in school. And we knew enough that we could get around and go barter and go buy candy, and go on adventures and do everything else that we wanted to needed to do, which I really just love that time. But now I just I just saw people as people, and I just saw their cultures as being different, and how unique and that’s cool. And maybe there’s some cool things I’d love to take from that culture and implement into my own micro cultural that I have within my family, you know,

Andrej Zito 

do you think it’s important for I don’t know, for families, or for kids to be raised this way where they’re more exposed to different people, different races, different cultures, like do you think like, maybe you would be different if you were just living in some, I don’t know, small town city in the US for the majority of your life.

Cyle Adair 

Yeah, again, this is where I love because I don’t, I don’t know any different. But what I do know is my wife, good example, she grew up in a small town, and an oil town here in here in Utah, about three hours away from here. And, you know, her dad was reflecting on the oilfield, meaning like, he was working on the oil, you know, actual pumps and everything like that. And so, you know, there in that town in particular, there was a lot of a lot of black people, you know, and realistically, to get not to get too many people upset or like that, her dad is kind of a racist, honestly, when it comes down to it. And it’s not because he’s naive. It’s just he doesn’t know, because he’s, he’s never really been around other black people. But he’s built into the, what I would call the Redneck stereotype that’s going Yeah. And that’s kind of your kind of the part of society that people don’t really like, because of that. And there’s a lot of other things. There are a lot of other things there. But ultimately, do I wish everybody could do that? Yes. But realistically, is everybody going to do it? No, they won’t be able to live around the world, they, you know, they got parents or a person that lives in a certain place, and they’re probably not going to move at least until they become adults. But I think the biggest thing for me is that people can keep their minds open. Because if you can do that, then you can go anywhere and be acceptable of it. In fact, I had a job offer from another organization. And one of the reasons why is they love the idea. They’re like, we could drop you in Congo. Or we could go drop you in Singapore, or we could go drop you in Brazil. And you would still, you’d still thrive in that area, you’d figure things out and you’d go do things. And it’s because I just know that hey, yeah, other cultures are just different, they do things differently. And that’s completely fine. So let me get on board and learn those things and do those things. But also, ultimately, I can still control the kind of culture the kind of lifestyle that I want.

Andrej Zito 

And when he started having kids, did you ever think about moving like with the kids? Would you do? And I don’t mean this any negatively, like, would you do to your kids, the same thing that your parents did to you? Or would you prefer them to be living and growing up in one place?

Cyle Adair 

No, no, I honestly. And by the way, sorry, are you married, by the way, or no, girlfriend are single never married. Alright, so that is, so my preference, I would love to live around the world. But my wife very much likes it here, which is a great thing. And I completely respect that. And, and we do definitely talk about like, what if we went on an adventure for a couple of months and went somewhere? Now ultimately, there’s lots of things in in that factor. One is, you know, can your career can your job? Can it can you work that time off? Or can you just work somewhere else remotely? In a sense, one of the reasons why I started transcend I mean, very small on the bucket list, but going, Hey, we could actually work from wherever we needed to, you know, in that aspect. As long as we got internet, you know, we could we could make that happen. So I would love to that. And we’ve talked about that of like going elsewhere to go explore. But I will say we’re not the extremist in the sense. It’s like, Let’s go live here for three months, and then here for three months, and then here and just go live all over the world. I know there’s some people, you know, the four hour workweek, I know really jumps on that Tim Ferriss and goes all over that. After reading that book and talking to my wife about it. We made the conscious decision that we like, we would like adventures and we’re actually pretty regular. We just got back from a cruise over in Mexico. And we we’d like to go on adventures and take our kids as much as we can on those. But like, Oh, you have to live in this place to get this culture. I don’t believe you have to do that. But also there’s so many different circumstances to say. It might not be like for me it’s not the right time in our lives. hasn’t been for the past eight or nine years to go, oh, let’s go do that and live all over. But very open to it for the future here. A lot of discussions about that. Now, I will say it’s not like you, we have to go live overseas. But a good example, I went on a church mission to Argentina. And the next three years, one of our goals is to go back to Argentina, take our kids, and go be there for at least two weeks. So we’re 100% on board, having figured out the timeline of when all that looks like and obviously the finances of doing that, because it’s not cheap, you know, but that’s one of those things. So we want to continue to take our our kids on adventure. And who knows, maybe after we go there by half goes, What if we lived here for like, six months a year? What if we did that, like, you know, there’s all sorts of things, but one of the things we would like to move eventually at some point, we’ve talked about Texas, we love living in Texas. And then also there’s a place in southern Utah, that is gorgeous. That is a real possibility too. But it’s still all things to get figured out.

Andrej Zito 

Is there any like a personal favorite place for you on your bucket list that you haven’t been to,

Cyle Adair 

to live or to visit like vacation,

Andrej Zito 

I guess both to vacation,

Cyle Adair 

I can talk towards that actually, my wife and I 10 year anniversary two years ago, we had we still have the money saved up for Bora Bora to go to Bora Bora. It was a it’s been on our bucket list. And so I’m happy to say next year, we’re finally gonna go and make it happen. And to do that, we were supposed to go for our 10 year wedding anniversary COVID Obviously hit everything got screwed up with that. So So Bora Bora is a bucket list place that we’d love to go. Another bucket list is for me is to take take my family down to go meet the wonderful people that I know down in Argentina, and to be able to go break bread with them and have dinner and have them live see their culture and visit and see the scenes that I that I had now I get they’re going to be no more nostalgic for me. But I think my wife and my kids will very much look forward to it and think about it all the time. Other than that my my daughter, she’s eight years old, she loves pina colada. So anytime we can get down to Mexico and get a good colada down there, we are all about that. And they love it. And they think it’s the coolest thing that dad can just talk to the all those people even though they don’t understand what they’re saying, because they’re in Spanish, you know. And so that, and one of the cool things is, is our kids are in a French Immersion program at school, at least the two older ones are and so one of the things that we’d like to do as well is go over to France. They’re not fluent. But their their French is very good that they could get around and where’s the bathroom? And oh, the bus and all the other kind of common terms that you’re like, oh, they can get us around. And I don’t speak French, you know. And so I that’s the one that we’re actually really looking forward to in the next couple of years as well, too.

Andrej Zito 

I see you’re diversifying the language knowledge among your family. So what why did you send them to to learn French?

Cyle Adair 

Honestly, what we happen to live about three blocks away from the elementary school. And it is a French Immersion program there. And so, you know, I said, How can we get in into that I’m all about it, even though I would have loved Spanish because then I could speak with my kids in Spanish. But at the same time, I look at it as a huge benefit. Because French is obviously another major language and I’m going helps me understand things more as well, too.

Andrej Zito 

I think I asked so many questions so far that I didn’t even prepare, because I’m just curious about what you’re saying. But I think that’s good. So why one important question that I have is when you were younger, let’s say I don’t know a teenager, what did you think that you were going to be as an adult, like for professional issue? Remember,

Cyle Adair 

probably the closest that I could get to is I thought I was going to be working at the New York Stock Exchange. I was a little bit I wouldn’t say an odd duck. But one thing that I realized when I was eight, eight years old, I started tracking mutual funds when we were eight years old. And the way that I did that is every Sunday, we would get the paper. And one day I was looking at it. And I saw all the super small fine print, it was the tickers for all these different stocks and mutual funds, okay. And it took up literally a whole entire page. And it just looked like gobbly gook to anybody else. And I remember looking at him like Dad, what is this? My dad’s like, Oh, those are stocks and mutual funds. And I’m like, Okay, what is that? And he’s like, Oh, well explain. These are stocks. This is what the company owns, you know, and this is how much their share of their company is and explain that all to me. And I’m like, okay, great. My dad was in the military. It’s not like he was some stock expert, but he put money away and would save, you know, almost every single month, you know, and put money into savings and stocks and invest and I remember him saying, Well, this is the one that me and your mom, this is what we put our money into right here is a Vanguard one. Okay, cool. So I started like, I keep an eye and I asked him I said, Hey, can I keep this paper? And he was like, Yeah, sure. I’m gonna throw it away anyways. And so over weeks and months and actually I would love to find it because it’s very clear in my mind, I mean, I would have a runny, I keep that page every single week, and I’d highlight in green, if that stock if the price actually would go up. Yellow, it was pretty much about the same. And then red mean that that stock was going down. So I started manually tracking again, this is in the 1980s. Okay, manually tracking what stocks were going up and what stocks were going down. And then I tell my mom and dad about them and say, like, look at look at this one has a trend. It’s going up and it’s going well, you know, and I’m sure you could, I mean, the internet’s not really they’re not around at that point. But I was like, the manual person. And I thought, you know, this is so cool. When I was in college, it really came out when I when I left high school and graduate from high school, it really came down to I said, you know, hey, why don’t we go to school? And that’s like, the hint of like, Mom and Dad, are you helping me out with this? Because I got other friends. Their parents are paying for them to go to college, you know? And it was like, oh, yeah, yeah, well, we’ll help you out. You need to go figure out financially. And so scholarships unless you want to go work your butt off and try to save that money. And I’m like, okay, so eye opening that sense. So I started like figuring out and going to apply for scholarships. And that’s when my dad said, Hey, did you know there’s these ROTC scholarships, like for the army and the Marines and the Navy? I said, Okay. And he goes, Yeah, I mean, that’s kind of a way to pay for school. And, you know, I happen to be a colonel in the, in the marine, so I could probably write a decent letter of recommendation and have some other people kind of write some letter recommendations, some generals and stuff like that, that we knew. And we’re neighbors. And so I did that, due to my good good grades, you know, being, you know, Captain and to sports and, and just kind of the service that I did, and stuff like that, was able to get full Army ROTC scholarship and a Marine Corps ROTC scholarship, I ended up choosing the army one just due to the school that I was going to and stuff like that. But when I went to school, I thought, hey, and just talk to my dad. He was like, hey, at that point, he had retired from the military and started working for Boeing. And he’s like, look, and I said, Hey, I want to go make money. I don’t want to be broke, you know, we, we were very middle income, probably middle lower income kind of stuff. And I thought, you know, and how I was raised is my parents were like, oh, cool, you want to go by that? Go figure out, go get a job, go do something, you know. And one of the things that I say is, my parents gave me everything, because they gave me nothing. And I mean, that in the financial sense. Now, I would be very disheartened. Like, it’s not like they completely gave me nothing, nothing ever. Like, you know, when school season came around, like we’d go shopping, and I’d get, you know, a couple new pairs of shirts and some jeans and some shoes, and oh, you want more than that. You want two pairs of shoes. Okay, you gotta go pay for that. But so it’s not like I’m ungrateful. And they know that. They I’m so grateful because they put a very, I learned work ethic because I had to go learn work ethic. But ultimately, I asked my dad, hey, what can I What should I major in? What should I go figure out and go? Do? I don’t want to be broke down? He’s like, Well, the people that make really good money that I know are they’re all electrical engineers. He’s working at Boeing, you know. And so I’m like, Okay, let’s go near, went and did that started taking all the prereqs, electrical engineering and all the chemistry and all the calculus and stuff like that, oh, like, this is hard. Electrical Engineering is hard. And I realized, man, there’s a lot more again, no offense, a lot more nerds around here. And I don’t think I really fit in with this like this is this is really hard for me. And this seems easier for them. And so I shifted gears and got into business is what the route I started going down. But what I, even when I was in school, and the Marriott School of Business is a pretty, it’s a top 10 business school in the country. And that’s what I graduated from. But I did, there was an investment bank, banking club, and I was a part of that. So I went out to you, New York. And with some other people, we had about 10 of us, there’s a lot more in the club. But this was kind of like the, that another the people really, really interested really trying to go down that path. And investment banking is not easy to get into. But we got wined and dined by Goldman Sachs and Credit Suisse and, and JP Morgan and Lehman Brothers, I’ll remember that brothers around Lehman Brothers, this was back in 2007. And so anyways, got to do that. And for me, it was at that point that I figured out I was like, I don’t want to do investment bank, and these people are working at minimum at minimum 60 hours a week. And a lot of them were working upwards of like, 100 hours a week, and it was just crazy. And I was like, wow, like, you gotta be all in to do that. And I realized that’s probably not what I want work life balance and stuff like that. So that’s what shifted my focus from thinking that hey, I was gonna go work at the New York Stock Exchange or go Do you know, banking or something like that and realizing that wasn’t quite for me, you know. And again, when it comes to banking, there’s all sorts of stuff there’s banking, like normal banking hours, I’m always jealous. I’m like, you get Columbus Day off, you get random banking holidays. And I’m like, Man, that’s nice, man. They get a lot of days off, but you got, what 25 holidays that you have in a year. That’s great. So, yeah,

Andrej Zito 

one thing that I’m curious, and you were talking about this, when you were answering the question in the earlier times you said about the work ethic, and I kind of like, agree with that. My question was, Is this something that you’re trying to teach your kids? Or are you more generous with them?

Cyle Adair 

I’m definitely more on the work ethic side. That’s what I’ve very firmly believe God’s got a lot more figured out than I do, and than anybody else for that matter. And that’s why I think he’s big on, you know, that marriage is a good thing. My wife brings certain personalities, aspects, she’s more of a nurturer. On the other side on the more disciplinary kind of person. And if we just raised our kids separately, obviously, there there could be some good things with that. But overall, I think that was not the best way. Like, they get the get the nurturing and the compassion a little bit more from my wife. And, and not that I’m not nurturing or compassion from time to time, but I’m more of the disciplinary, like, okay, great. They’re like, Hey, Dad, I want this out the store, I’m like, awesome, cool. Do you have any money on you? Know, I’m like, well, that’s gonna be hard. You go talk to the cash register and see if you can just take it home. And they’ve learned that lesson where they like, Go, they’re like, Can I have this? And they’re like, Okay, that’s $3 Do you have $3? And they’re like, no, they’re like, sorry, you can’t, you know, and so just little lessons like that, that I enjoy doing that. And my daughter in particular, she’s always figuring out ways to make money and to do that, which is great, you know, and my other son, he’s, he’s figured out, you know, bake sales and, and trading Pokemon cards and selling his Pokemon cards and all sorts of other things. So I enjoy that. Are they the most like, entrepreneur kids ever? You know, no, no, I think there’s a lot of parents that really focus and really do that, which is great. But at the same time, I want my kids to try to enjoy a little bit of life and be a kid. But yeah, there’s some life lessons that they need to learn. And they’ll learn along the way. I mean, they’re still a long ways, my hope is when they leave, and they graduate from high school and start heading off to college, or I’m not even against if they go to a you know, a technical school to be a plumber or electrician, or whatever else that they might want to be. But at that point, they’re gonna go, Okay, I got stay out of debt, you know, work hard, go figure it out, you know, be resourceful, you know, ask for help, and you need help, stuff like that. I hope they have that pretty well figured out. And I think they’re on a great trajectory right now for that. This

Andrej Zito 

may be a weird question coming from someone like I told you is not married, no kids, but did you ever think about maybe even in the earlier days, that your approach of being let’s say, the bad cop would make the kids love you less? Especially when they’re younger?

Cyle Adair 

Yeah, I mean, being the bad cops never find, honestly, it’s things and my wife and I, we talked about that. I’m like, Hey, could you help out and be the bad cop? every once awhile? Like, yeah, that’d be really nice. Because, you know, I don’t want to be the bad cop all the time. In fact, you know, being the youngest in my family, where I grew up, you know, with my older sisters, and having, you know, I’m the uncle, I’m, I’m the fun cool uncle, like, I’ve come around, you know, especially before I was married, that let’s go spend, let’s go do this. Let’s go take them out. Let’s go do all this stuff. And I spoil them and have a good time with them. And they’re like, man, that’s awesome that I got my kids like, my kids don’t believe my nieces and nephews Now who are you know, you know, not all of them completely grown. But you know, they’re teenagers, if not, you know, graduated in college or whatever. Now, they’re like, what you thought my dad was cool. Like, what’s the deal? You know? So I think there is, again, I think there’s a good balance there. My brother actually had a, now an ex wife, that she had a very different perspective on thing. She wanted to be her kids best friends. And I would say, I strongly don’t agree with that perspective. I think parents need to be parents, and they need to help kit set their kids. And that means loving them as well, too. But being just their friend is not. Again, in my opinion, it’s just it’s not the way to go about things because they need a parent, they don’t need a friend they get they’re going to have lots of friends in life. And they’re going to get that a parent is something very unique. And a parent needs to be a parent. And that’s something that I feel like the world is changing quite a bit on. Everybody wants to be friends with their kids, or they just want to get along with them. But I think in a lot of ways, they’re setting them up for failure. And I think in the long run, they’ll probably go, Man, I should have told them that I should have stood up and said no, I’m your I’m your parent. And this is sadly, this is the rules. And this is what we’re going to have to do not well, you can do whatever you want, but that’s not what I would want to do. Like I’m your I’m your friend. I’m your buddy. Well, I’ll support you whatever you want. Like sometimes I think you just got to lay down the rules. wasn’t go. Sorry. Not possible. Well,

Andrej Zito 

thank you for being open about this, because I guess it’s not the the most positive answer that maybe some people would want to hear, but I appreciate it.

Cyle Adair 

And it’s just my thinking and my philosophy on things, you know, like said, I don’t have it all figured out. So sure some people will be like, he’s dead wrong. And that’s, that’s okay. They can have their opinion. And I have my opinion, you know,

Andrej Zito 

so I’m now going to ask about the army thing. Because I didn’t know about it until today, when I finally went to your LinkedIn profile. I was like, like, what? US Army? So now that you’re talking about your dad, kind of like makes more sense. But I’m still curious, what was the primary reason why you joined an army? Like, why does the young person join army? And maybe to give you my context is I think I mentioned to you that I’m from Slovakia. And when I was a teenager, the like, like, going to the army, I’m not sure what is the English term for that, like, used to be mandatory? Like, every every guy had to do that. I was so afraid of it. And then fortunately, they cancelled it. So it was only like a professional army since then. So I didn’t have to do that. But I would be so afraid to do that. And it looks like from what I understand that you did it voluntarily. So why does the young person do that?

Cyle Adair 

So the the, the real reason why I was interested at first is because I go, Oh, man, I need to pay my way through school. We’re gonna go get a scholarship or money or something like that. And honestly, that was it that I realized, like, okay, we can do that there. And that was because my dad said, Hey, by the way, and again, I’m figuring things out. I’m 1516 years old, you know, at that point, almost 17 years old. And I’m like, Oh, okay. Well, that’s a scholarship potentially. So let’s apply and go through that. My story of why I actually went through it, everything is a different story, though. So I, I showed up I wouldn’t looked at different schools, got accepted to different universities, and then decided to go to Brigham Young University out here in Utah, from Oklahoma, moved out to Utah, just felt like it was the right thing that Army ROTC, they did not have Marines. And so that’s the reason why I chose to do the army, instead of the Marines is because they had the ROTC program, there. Now, the ROTC program is you’re going to school. But you also part of your schooling is you is that you take military science classes, you understand, you know, the art of war, you understand tactics and procedures, and why the military does certain things, and how to dress and you get uniforms and stuff like that as well, too. So it’s kind of like baby stepping into the military without having to go to like a boot camp in a sense that just get thrown into the blender and go, Oh, man, and to ROTC, there’s two different aspects of the military. There’s what they call enlisted. These are people that just go directly into the military, and those are those people that go to boot camp. And then there’s officers, officers, you’re required to have a four year degree. And so and then you go through this training as well, two officers typically lead the the enlisted soldiers in a sense, and so they’re kind of making more taking or giving more of the orders and things like that. It’s a very, very interesting, like cultural world that you look at, because a lot of people go well, the officers are like the C level suite people, you know, like, they’re the bosses, they’re in charge, they can do whatever they want. And everybody else is just the employees, you know, but you see, like how well they work together, how much of the respect there is, and how much that a good leader will listen to employees all day long, in my opinion, and where you see that in the military, and where you drastically see that doesn’t happen sometimes in the military as well. But ultimately, I decided on the army went down that route. After my freshman year of college, I had a four year degree or a four sorry, a four year scholarship. So my first year, the military paid for my first year of college and what I mean, they paid they paid for my tuition. And then they paid me for a little bit of a stipend for room and board, and for books and things like that. So it paid for a pretty good chunk of it, but not all of my, my, my college. So after my freshman year, I had I guess you could say a spiritual awakening. And that’s where I felt very compelled, that I wanted to go share my testimony about Jesus Christ. And so how you do that within the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, which is the religion that I part of is then you, you you express that and then you put in your paperwork to say yes, I would like to go on a mission to do that. And you don’t get any say or any pick I lived in Japan when I was little for three years, you know, knew Japanese better than any other language. In fact, I took high school Spanish, and was horrible at at the worst grades that I ever got in high school. And for whatever reason, was asked to go down to Argentina, and to work with people there for two years in Spanish and I thought, hilarious, I don’t speak Spanish but I’ll figure it out, you know, and learning Spanish was Much harder for me compared to learning Japanese. But anyways, eventually it took time and finally did that it was while I was there. And I have a very specific story of what happened. When I was there in Argentina, I had been there for about a year I was talking with a family, they actually got deported from the United States back to Argentina, they were in Miami, they got caught, they they were illegal aliens got caught and got deported back to Argentina. Argentina is a little bit different, too, because their laws and I don’t know if they’re still the same, but 20 plus years ago, when I was there, you could go and you could squat at home and be at a home. And after six months, if no one is there, that technically is their home and you can’t kick them out, even though you might own the property. Kind of odd in that sense. So you see a lot of people when they go on vacations or whatever, they truly have like a security guard or so a house sitter that comes and stays at the house. But the long story with that is they were actually at a very nice house. And that’s how we met him. They said come on over. And so we came over, we thought it was really odd. I say nice house, but nice in Argentina, for the most part, that was really odd that I thought, why are they cooking under the stove, you know, kind of thing. And what I found out as they didn’t have any power, or any electricity or any gas going to their home, because they didn’t own the home, they were just squatting at that house didn’t find that out until later. So they’re cooking up the stove, and the husband, they’ve got two different kids. And he’s just complaining like this is complete crap, like we came from. In Florida, we had like our Playstations. And we were life was so good. And you know, and we had so much more money and stuff like that. And now we’re here back in Argentina. And he was very vitriol about it, that he was just like, this is such a crappy country. And man, I’m like we’re looking at we’re cooking our food in a wood stove. Like this is ridiculous, you know, and he is so like, upset with it. And it was at that point that it really clicked of like, how blessed that I am. To be born in the United States be a citizen in the United States. And truly the opportunities that we have there in so many things that we’re blessed with both financially and economically, and freedoms that were blessed with that it hit me right then about a year into living in Argentina, that man, we are blessed. And if there’s something that I could do to help our country be the same situation, I feel obligated to do something like that. So fast forward a year later, after I got home, from my mission, two years of being in Argentina, got back and now he’s going back to school to go to my sophomore year of college. And literally, when I hit the ground in Dallas, that’s where airport landed. And I got to the literally the physical ground, I had to go across a terminal terminal, and it was on cement. But I literally like kissed the ground. And it’s not because Argentina is bad. I can’t wait to go back there. It’s just it, I realized how much I appreciate and how lucky I was, you know, there’s billions of people in the world. And the luck that we I have to be here to have the opportunities they have is very lucky. So anyways, I made that decision came back. And my four year scholarship allowed me to get the first year my freshman year completely free with no obligation. And then I had to make that decision my sophomore year once I got back. And so they said, Hey, are you doing this because if you do, and you sign the dotted line, you start taking government money to pay for your education, your your your Oh, and I said, Absolutely. I’m 100% in and then from that I owed four years back of active duty military time. And, and so I actually ended up doing a little over that five years or so due to go into on deployments and just wanting to make sure I fulfilled all my obligations. And then in two, I didn’t know if I was going to make it a career and be there for 20 plus years. Or if I thought, hey, maybe I’m just going to do four years and get out. I didn’t know. But after you know, four plus years in, that’s when I made the decision. Specifically my wife and I made the decision that hey, we’re gonna transition from the military, being home a year then gone a year home a year gone a year in the war countries just didn’t seem like long term what we wanted. And there’s a lot of other things there too, you know?

Andrej Zito 

Yeah, I pretty much know or I can assume what your answer to this question would be, but I’m still going to ask where are you afraid of dying? Like, was that ever on your mind? Or was like the higher purpose of what you can do for the country? Like more important to you?

Cyle Adair 

Well, Andre, you tell me. Let’s go through your assumption real quick. And just hear that? Well,

Andrej Zito 

my assumption would be that yes, to me, like it’s like, I don’t know. But maybe it’s just basically based on how I feel in that situation. And I would be very, very scared for my life. That’s why I didn’t even want to go to the thing that I mentioned to you before, but I don’t know maybe for you. It was completely different. Like maybe you saw the purpose as the most important thing and you didn’t even think about your own life. I don’t know. But you also mentioned your wife, so it’s not like you were just on your own right.

Cyle Adair 

Yeah. So I I finished up school, commissioned as an officer, the training duty station went on my first deployment, it was after my first deployment, that’s actually when I found my wife, and we started dating. And then we got engaged and we got married, I stayed pretty quickly, it was within a five month period. So for some people, that’s really fast for other people to go, oh, that’s normal, you know, kind of thing. Everybody’s a little bit different. It felt very fast, particularly for me, but the only way that I could describe it to my friends, they’re like, Wow, you’re getting married that fast? Like, do you even know her? You know, and the biggest way that my wife, and I could describe it to each other is when you know, you know, so why wait three years, or five years, or however long? You know, some people deem as enough time to actually know somebody we just knew, we just knew that we wanted to be together, and we knew that we would figure it out. And there’d be lots of surprises along the way. And that’s okay. You know, that’s what life and that’s what marriage kind of looks like. So, for me that I think about dying, not really, I was into a little bit more of the cause and the purpose. And in two, I will say, on the spiritual front, like I very much believe there is a life after this. And not that I’m like, got it all figured out. And I’m gonna go to heaven and all that other stuff. I hope that I hope that’s the case. But I’d really don’t fear that I really, I just don’t really worry about dying. My wife, she’s a little bit more on the other side, where she’s a little bit more going mad. Dying is a scary thing. For me, I don’t think it’s a scary thing. Honestly, I think it’s just a transition. Maybe I look at it very similar to when we moved from Japan to San Diego, you know, like, it’s just part of a transition. It’s just what it is. And I genuinely believe the people that we know here and the relationships that we we make here, that we’ll be able to have those but even more on a higher elevated level after this life. So I don’t mind dying, like, do I want to leave my wife and kids for that? No. But at the same time, I definitely don’t live my life, I would say in fear, definitely in Iraq. I mean, during my first deployment, I got a Bronze Star for for some of the Well, for one particular mission. And there was times I definitely put my health self in harm’s way to help my men, and to make sure that they came back safely and alive. That was my, I wasn’t worried about dying, I was more worried of having to go back to the soldiers that I was over and that they reported to me, and having to go back to their spouses and their families. Because the military, you get to know them, you know, you see him at balls, you see him at different functions that we hold. And I didn’t promise them. But I remember just thinking wholeheartedly, like, I will make sure your husband comes back, like I will make sure and that’s probably if I if I had to say what was the proudest part of my military career, it was going, taking soldiers over to war, doing the missions that we did, and successfully doing it. But more importantly, bringing them all home, without thankfully any serious harm or accident to them, which I feel very lucky for so, so no, I didn’t worry about that stuff. I will say on the other side, it depends on how you’re raised again, I, my dad, he went to the Gulf War, you know, he was a colonel when he went and did that. I was 888 and nine years old when that happened. So I really wasn’t too bad. I guess, growing up in the military, it’s not like it makes you not afraid. But I just knew that my dad described it the best way I’ll say this much. You do so much training, I think it’s really easy to go Oh, go to war or whatever. My dad went through almost his whole career, he went through almost 16 years. It was training and training and training. But there was never any war that he went to. He missed the Vietnam War, just barely. And so it’s just training and training and training. And so when it was time to go to war, he’s like, Coach put me in, we’re ready. Like, you know, why would you it’s like an NFL, you know, professional football player. They’re training all the time, but to never actually play in a game. Like, who would want to do that? No, go use your skills, go, go go do something, even though Yes, life and death is on the line on that aspect. Well, my wife and I got married, we got married. And then six weeks later, I deployed on my second deployment. And one of the things that we made a conscious decision and what I really recommended to my wife is true, we just barely got married, but she could stay in Utah where she had been, you know, and stay close to family and have other support systems there. Or she can move out to Texas where she really didn’t know anybody. But there’s also the support system of other soldiers, wives and things like that as well there too. And so my very strong recommendation is that she move out to Texas and she lives there, because that’s where now our home is going to be. And even more is it’s a very different front if you’re not familiar with the military. If you were, you know, we’re in Utah right now and other places that aren’t familiar with the military, you know, and I say familiar that there. It’s not like everybody around them is in the military. And it’s easy, especially at that time to look on the news and go, Wow, you know, almost daily, you’re hearing of an explosion, somebody died seriously injured, whatever it might be. And that’s got to be it was harder on my wife than it was on me on my deployment, because she had the what if what’s going on? I don’t know what’s going on all the way. And so being around other military people and their spouses, yeah, there was that thought still in the back of their minds, but they thought, we’re here. I know what’s going on. Oh, I heard from so and so’s wife like, Oh, they’re doing okay. And I think a lot of times to Hollywood beefs this up as that, like, you’re in a war torn area, you’re shooting at each other all the time. And that’s happening all the time, I would say, and this is just my circumstance, but I would say this would probably be across the board. 90% of it is not exciting. Hollywood times. The bullets aren’t flying past year. But for the other 10% Yeah, it’s suspenseful, there’s bullets, there’s bombs going off. There’s other things, and there’s that chance of you dying, but but the other 90% of time, sometimes it’s sleeping, sometimes it’s getting on the internet, or at least thankfully, we had internet, you know, and like, you know, getting some emails done. And I don’t know, just normal work stuff, especially in my world as an officer writing reports and others just stuff that is like, not sexy, not cool. You don’t see this in Hollywood or on the movies. And then the other 10% Yeah, we were on missions, we are in the in the fight, you know, of, of, you know, potentially getting killed. And ideally, the biggest thing is hunting down bad guys and capturing or killing them if we had to at times. So

Andrej Zito 

if you are not afraid of that, what is it that you are afraid of?

Cyle Adair 

For me, I think kind of different. A couple different things, I would say my biggest fear is being a failure. And that can be on probably multiple fronts. But the first one that comes to mind is being a failure to my wife, and to my kids, I look at it and my wife and I have a very good understanding she is a full time mom, she is not in a career. Other than being a full time mom, which is a full time job in so many different ways. I am I am a provider, I need to make financial gains for our family to be able to live the lifestyle that we live in to have the things that we have. So we have certain roles. And we understand that some families, maybe it’s the wife that does that, and the husband stay at home dad. But for me being a failure and not being able to provide for my family. And it doesn’t mean that we need to be rich, but not being able to provide and go pay the mortgage and have food on the counter. And so there’s that side, also being a failure and not teaching my kids the life lessons that they need to be eventually, you know, when they turn 18. And when they graduate from high school to go off to college that they’re going, I don’t know how to do my own laundry. No, our 10 year old kid, he knows how to do his own laundry and our eight year old, she knows how to fold her own laundry. But she doesn’t start it up and put all this soap in and do all that other stuff yet. But as long as I know that they’re making those progressions, that’s very important to me. So I don’t want to fail on those two aspects. The next failure that I look at, and I’ve kind of talked about this life, life has three different balls, has a wooden ball, a glass ball, and a rubber ball. And I’m juggling those things all the time. And I think this is across the board for everybody. Everybody’s juggling those things, okay? The rubber ball, for me significantly signifies work, okay? You don’t want it to fall. But guess what, if it falls, it’s going to bounce back up, whether you quit your job or get fired, you’re probably gonna go find another job, and you’re gonna have a job most likely might not be the one that you want, but it’s a rubber ball, and it’s going to bounce back. So for me, if I have to drop one, it’ll most likely be in the Workfront. The next one is the wooden ball. The wooden ball for me is is is basically my family and my kids and are sorry, the wooden ball is my is my friends. Okay? Those are the ones again, we talked about, like, Hey, you systematic and doing that, like no, I want to stay in touch with them, though. And I want to let them know that I’m going to be there for him if they really need something. And that one can get dropped from time to time, sometimes, you know, we’ve got these get together. And it’s like, Man, I already have something else planned. So I won’t be able to make it this month or this time or whatever, you know, that one can get dropped from time to time. But if you drop it too many times eventually gets enough nicks or it can crack and it can break, you know. And then my third one, which is that glass ball. That’s my family. That’s my my wife and my kids. Okay, if I dropped that one. I mean, yeah, it can take a little bit of scratch here and there. But for me, you can’t break like you can’t let that drop 20 times because then it eventually it won’t be there anymore, it will be broken. And that will can take a lot less drop. So I’m always juggling those things. And that’s how I kind of put in priority of that. So when I talk about what am I scared of? It’s being a failure, and probably in that reverse order. I can’t be a failure to my wife and my kids. I can’t be a failure to my friends, you know, to be there for them if they really need it. And then I can’t be a failure to my work. You know, I don’t really care too much about all the accolades Like, I can say that I mean, yeah, it’s really nice to have accolades and be like, Oh, I’m successful doing this. And that, you know, I mentioned, you know, being in the military having a Bronze Star, actually, I two Bronze Stars, but those are nice. Those are great awards. And like, am I not proud of them? No, I’m definitely proud of them. But at the same time, if I dropped that, and I don’t have that, that’s okay. I have those other things. And so hopefully, that makes sense of like, what am I scared of its failure, and in failure to myself to like, more than anything else have, I think highly of myself, like, I want to go achieve things and go do things and, and taking that pride in myself to say, like, I can go do that. I may not making, you know, doing that. That’s the worst fear that I have that I don’t just don’t show up in the way that I know, I could show up.

Andrej Zito 

Usually people who are afraid of failure, especially for themselves tend to be perfectionist. Is that something you see yourself as or?

Cyle Adair 

Not really? No, I definitely would say the, probably a little bit more on the perfectionist side, my wife does a good job of reminding me that it’s okay. That it’s not perfect. Guess what? House is messy. That’s okay. Like, it’s okay, the house can get messy. And it can be that way, even for a couple of days, and no one dies. And it’s all okay. And so, again, that’s the, for me the benefit of having a marriage and a partner that can you know, this might sound very cliche, but I truly believe my wife completes me, like makes me whole. And it’s because I’m missing certain gaps in my personality and who I am, that she can literally fill in, and she can help teach me learn those things. And so us together. That doesn’t mean that we’re like, perfect, but we can become that way. If we work together if I listened to her and fill in those gaps. And when she needs help and support and things that she’s not good at, like budgeting and in dollars and money and numbers and stuff like that. I’m more of that person. But she’s so much better at going, hey, you know, just the nurturer. And just seeing some things and going Hey, did you think about maybe how you said that to somebody that? Maybe it wasn’t the best way? Oh, yeah, I didn’t realize that. Thanks for bringing that to my attention. You know, those are all all good things. So but yeah, I would say definitely I have a little bit more of a perfectionist kind of mentality.

Andrej Zito 

Okay. I was curious about this, even though it’s maybe not so related. When you mentioned that when you met your wife that you knew very soon that she was the one was this like the complimenting think one of the things that make you feel like she’s the one and part of my questions like, I was curious whether whether you can imagine that you would be in a similar, I guess, happy and fruitful relationship with someone who would be more like you are you don’t see that happening?

Cyle Adair 

So I don’t think I saw that completely. At first. I don’t think anybody does, because and I think that’s why a lot of people wait a long time to get married, because they want to like, figure that out. And only time can tell you it takes a long time to get to really truly know somebody. What I recognized as one, I thought she was beautiful. Okay, that’s I don’t know about everybody else. But maybe some people don’t even look at looks, but I thought she was gorgeous. And I thought, cool. Check. We got that check box. That’s great. She’s, she’s hot in my book, you know. So that was first thing. And then I got to know her personality. Man, she is so interesting. And I love talking to her and getting her thoughts and ideas. And she shares those openly. And, and, and then I thought, Man, she’s really humble, too, you know, but she’s actually very driven at the same time. There’s so many different things that she had going on. And I thought man is a really good thing. One of the things that like, made it to the next level of just like, Man, this girl’s amazing to pay, I should really think about maybe marrying this girl. And that was this. My when I when I went on a mission to Argentina, you have a bunch of people that are you know, guys and girls that are missionaries, and they’re younger, you know, we’re in our early 20s, you know, so we’re still figuring out life away a lot of ways. There’s a mission president, my mission president happened to be in his in his mid 40s. Very, very wise man. Probably one of the people that I admire and respect absolutely the most of he’s got a lot of life figured out a lot of life, a lot of wisdom. And there’s a reason in our church of why he got called and why other people get called to be mission presidents. Because there’s mission presidents all over the globe. I think there’s like 350, or almost 400 different missions across the globe. And there’s a mission president for each one of those and they’re married, and they have families and they have normal jobs and lives, but they take time. And there they actually get called for three years to do that. And, and so anyways, one of the things and I became actually really close with him and got to spend a significant amount of time with him compared to some other people due to just some things that he asked me to do. And the thing that he said, right when I was leaving my my time my two years is he gave me some counsel about marriage. And he said that’s probably one of the next big steps that you They’ll make, you’re gonna go figure out your career, you’re gonna go get more education. But marriage is a pretty big lifelong like careers, you can switch careers, wives probably shouldn’t switch wives shouldn’t shouldn’t get divorced. That’s, that’s not a long term thing that you know, you don’t want to switch around a whole bunch. And he said, marry the person that you see best that would be able to take care of your kids. And if I had to say, one of the most amazing attributes of my wife, it would be that she is the best nurturer and the best mother. And I could see that when we started dating, that it like, switch, I’m like, she would be amazing at this. And, yeah, I want to have kids at some point. I don’t know when but, and that’s when it clicked. And I was like, I remember in that little, that that conversation that I had, she’s six, almost seven years earlier popped in my mind. And I thought, oh, that’s what he’s talking about. And she kind of fits the bill. So I should maybe really think about this a little bit more. And we were just in love. And I think the biggest thing when it was all said and done. So all those little things, all these little checkmarks added up. And then the thing that kind of threw me over is that she was willing to that she had the same heart and understanding in mind that I did to go, you know what? I know, we’re not, we don’t have a lot of stuff figured out. But we’ll figure it out. And I’m committed to you. And we’ll figure that out together to do that. You know. So that was for me of like, what, what really went in into that and like helped make my decision of who I wanted to marry.

Andrej Zito 

I’ll try the the second part of the question again, like, do you think like, you could have this kind of relationship with someone who would be more like you?

Cyle Adair 

Yes. Yes, but I don’t, I think and so the funny thing is, they call these people in my opinion, and again, maybe I’m boasting of myself or whatever. But, you know, you’ve heard of the term power couples, you know, they’re a power couple. Like, he’s like, I got a friend, my best friend growing up in Oklahoma. And still literally, I was just talking to him two days ago, on the phone. His wife is a pediatrician. He’s a lawyer, very, very, very good lawyer. And so they are, in my opinion, what the world would see is they’re a power couple, they make really good money, you know, and they’re a power couple. So that’s what people would describe that. And again, I’m not going to say on his relationship, could I go find somebody that was a little bit more like what you’re saying, like me, business driven, you know, kind of kind of that very ambitious, perfectionist? Yes. But for me, it’s not about how much money that you make. It’s not how much accolades you have, or awards that you have. For me, I’m trying to figure out how to make myself whole and I perfect is probably the wrong word. In fact, the Greek term for perfect means whole, it doesn’t mean that you never make a mistake, it means that your whole and I’m truly trying to figure out how I can be more whole in my life. And my wife is the perfect complement to do that. Although most people looking at it, you know, might go oh, you know, I’m sure people look at her and you’re like, you got your yourself an anchor, have a husband, they’re like, man, he doesn’t even get like a lot of this nurturing stuff very well. And she goes, that’s alright, he sees things that I don’t see. And some people could describe her and go, Oh, man, but she’s not like, you know, making a ton of money. She’s not doing this. She’s, she’s not the perfection. And she’s okay if the house is dirty now and again, you know, kind of thing. And and that’s, we get that that’s where we see things eye to eye is we’re trying to help complete each other make each other whole. So could it work with somebody else? I think it absolutely could. But I think for the long run, this is absolutely what I was looking for, not so much to, you know, have a power couple.

Andrej Zito 

If you’re looking to be hole yourself, do you think I don’t know if we want to make this a little bit more general? Do you think that person can be hole on their own? Or does it need to be always someone to complete you to be hole?

Cyle Adair 

No, I think genuinely somebody can be whole on their own. But I say that they can become whole. And that’s what I’m striving for as well to kind of explain this concept. I’m definitely looking to become whole by myself. But if I don’t have good teachers, and somebody helped me along the way, I don’t think people can get there on their own completely. Like they’re going to need good teachers, they’re going to need good support systems. My wife happens to be the best support system in that aspect. And I think, too, you know, I’m going to use two circles here. You know, some people go, Oh, they’re going to be whole like it’s two whole people getting together. The way that I look at it is know once we become more and more whole ourselves. We become truly one in a lot of ways and that’s what I believe God wants us to be is to become one and a relationship that we can become Hold together that our wholeness as we complete each other, it helps us to individually become whole as well.

Andrej Zito 

May I ask you, how would you define being hole?

Cyle Adair 

How would I define being hole?

Andrej Zito 

Yes.

Cyle Adair 

That’s tough. I think hole would for me would be well rounded. And a lot of different aspects, you know, we talked about, you know, culturally, you know, living in different culture. Can you be whole without knowing all these other cultures? Yeah, and some aspects, but there is some things that you need to see some other cultures and appreciate that or see that or understand that a little bit more. So, yeah, I would just probably say, well, well rounded, you know,

Andrej Zito 

okay, so it doesn’t have to do something with strengths and weaknesses, like covering your weaknesses by someone else’s strengths, or is it about something more?

Cyle Adair 

Yeah, I think you’re right. Like that’s, you’ve got some really good questions here, by the way. That is a that is a really good question. Like, what is that mean? Being whole? I agree. It’s kind of like on the strength and weakness, weak weakness? Kind of side? Like, it’s, I don’t know how to describe that. Yeah. It’s like helping each other out and their strengths and their weaknesses. Yeah. I think it is. I yeah, that that is a very deep question, Andre, because I realized, I have not thought about that near as much as I want. Specifically me for, you know, religious sake, you know, for, you know, being a believer in Jesus Christ. For me, that’s what I feel like God wants us to become as to hope to be, eventually become whole. And we need his help to do that. But what does hole really look like? Is it just not making mistakes? Or sinning? You know, like, I don’t know, that’s, that’s where it’s like, that’s a really good question. I just feel like I just want to become better. I want to make less mistakes, you know, man, you need to come to grips with me, Andre, we figure this out. That’s where I feel like we talk about this stuff. And I’m like, no one’s ever really asked that question of like, what is that? What is that? What is whole look like truly, like I do vision boards, and I can try to imagine like, what my future looks like. And we set goals myself and my wife, we do a retreat every single year, we do our vision board, separate vision ones, and then also together, what are some of our goals that we want to achieve together? But man, what is whole really defined? And look, I

Andrej Zito 

know, like the vision boards and everything that that sounds like a very rational or like the eighth type think. But to me, like the whole term whole? Seems like there has to be something more than just figuring out, you know, strengths and weaknesses and covering your bases. Right? Yeah.

Cyle Adair 

I completely agree with that. It there. It is definitely more than that. I just don’t know how to describe it, or define it or really even, I just don’t even know all the way right? What that all the way looks like, I finally got you if I know you’ve got me, you don’t have an S. That is, that is definitely what to? I love, just ponder it like so. For me, I try to take 15 minutes every single day and write in a journal or a focus. In fact, I have it here at my desk. It’s called focus. And this is just the daily journal asked me some very specific questions for that day. How will I maintain an attitude of gratitude? What are some key win wins that I’ve had recently? What are some affirmations? And then it has a quote in the quote changes every single day and what it just asked me what does this quote mean to me? And then it has an a whole nother page where I just can journal about anything. And this is one of the ones that I know is going to come up tomorrow for me of what is the whole look like? What is whole mean?

Andrej Zito 

So yeah, how does it feel like, right?

Cyle Adair 

Yeah, what does it feel like? Yeah,

Andrej Zito  

keep going back to the metaphor of the three bowls that you mentioned. Seemed like you’re pretty clear on the priorities. But has it ever happened to you that you either intentionally or by accident switch the priorities?

Cyle Adair 

Yeah, yeah, there definitely is time. I mean, I can’t, I can’t say, you know, I can think of a time when going out with friends, you know, or a guy trip, you know, going to a football game we a couple years ago, you know, I had to miss out on my kids soccer game for a weekend because I went out with the guys and we went down to Moab Utah, and we were riding mountain bikes and doing rappelling and things like that. So yeah, I mean, ultimately, I say those priorities switch but that’s why I talk about they’re they’re kind of balls like they’re going to all they’re all going to get dropped. I’d love to meet the person that says like, oh, I never dropped the ball but all of them are going to get dropped at some point. But for me the glass last one my family you got to drop that the least amount of times as possible, but it’s gonna happen where you drop that and you go, but I still got the wooden one. I still got the rubber one right. I’m still juggling. Man, like, I still got work, and I still got my friends. And so I’m juggling that. But you try to pick up that glass ball as quickly as you can and keep on juggling them all.

Andrej Zito 

What is your approach to cleaning up the mess when you drop, especially the glass bowl? Just just my impression? Again, this could be based on stereotypes. And also based on your profile that used to be a sales guy, mostly, how do you go? I don’t know. Like, even if you go apologize, I don’t know, to your wife or to your kids. If I was looking at it, would it look like you’re being vulnerable? Or would it look like you’re being very professional, and maybe even let’s say salesy about admitting your mistake, if you know if you know where I’m going with this question, yeah.

Cyle Adair 

Are you just saying sorry? Because you’re saying sorry? Because that’s what is expected? And that’s what you’re supposed to do? Or are you generally sorry? And trying to make improvements, you know, is the way that I kind of define that?

Andrej Zito 

Yes, something like that. I think you can also be genuinely sorry. But like your delivery could still be maybe, let’s say, professional or maybe rehearsed, in a way. Or it’s like, like, really, you open up in a way? And I’m not sure how that looks like, in your case?

Cyle Adair 

What does it look like to clean up those mistakes? I will say that’s where, again, having a great support system. So the funny thing is the really good one, having a great work environment, like we can talk about, like personal stuff all the time. And I get to get their perspective and go, you know, when I’m venting about like, oh, man, I did this. And then yeah, my wife wasn’t super happy about that, you know? And then they go, Well, yeah, of course, they were. She’s not happy about that. What about this? And it’s like, Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. Maybe I’m just stuck in my head. And I did something stupid, you know, kind of thing. My friends are really good at that, you know, we’re very supportive of ourselves, and how can we support ultimately, we all understand, I think that’s when I say all my friends, particularly I think of like, my really close friends, they get it, your spouse comes first, no matter what, you know, your spouse comes first. And so we’re always encouraging, you know, spouses get mad at, you know, other spouses. That’s just what happens. But at the same time, if you can help see another perspective, we love talking about that, not so much the vent about it, but the learner, like, what am I not seeing here? Why am I not seeing like, why is it a big deal? Because of that? Why are my kids blowing up at me? I could just shake that off and say, because they’re eight and 10 years old, and that’s, they’re just kids, and they don’t know any better? Or can I go you know, what, maybe there’s a lesson to learn from that. And maybe they have some, some, you know, justification that I’m just not seeing there. That’s why having a really good support system of good friends, a good spouse, in my opinion, because they will be able to help you see that light a little bit more clearly, compared to, you know, a normal argument of just like, Well, no, you’re wrong, and no, you’re wrong. But it my wife is, for the most part, not always perfect, but you know, really good about like, hey, will, this hurt my feelings? Because and this is my view on it, and bringing it up in a good way that we can discuss it rather than a yelling match or something like that, you know, that it could turn into so how do I do that? I don’t know I had was, you know, that it not come off salesy. I don’t know. For me, it’s just trying to be genuine. Try to be authentic, try to be vulnerable, as well to the more I do that, the more the better. The relationships are more that I’m salesy or fake, the more I realized it just doesn’t really pay off in the long run, it might get you the immediate answer that you want, where they’re like, Okay, he’s sorry, or whatever, but they know they don’t really maybe believe it all the way or Yeah, and it just doesn’t pay off. And I don’t know how to really describe it, it doesn’t pay off because they know it’s not really there. But if they genuinely believe it, it builds into this this piggy bank, you know, things that they go I know I can count on him he’s put into my piggy bank lots of times you know,

Andrej Zito 

is it difficult for you to admit a mistake?

Cyle Adair 

I would say definitely Yep. I would definitely say that I would definitely say that I am more quick to try to justify my mom taught me taught me this years ago and I am only more and more now able to see it you know is oh man I’m forgetting the term or the the wording on it. Oh, I’m gonna butcher this this is not it. But it’s just not coming exactly in mind but justification is like the the quickest way down the hill you know that that’s what Satan wants you to go down is like the justify all this stuff. And I’m pretty quick at that actually. I’m like, but it makes sense because, you know, yes, you know, people are like yeah, I don’t care like good example. You know, you don’t you don’t yell at co workers. You don’t you don’t yell had employees, you know, you don’t do that. They might have really screwed up. And I think you could, you know, justify, but like, I have the justification, you know, but no, you don’t do that. You don’t do that. And so for me, again, it just comes back to it really need that support system because I need people to call me out and go, Nope, you’re wrong. Might need to wake up a little bit, might need to humble yourself a little bit, but you’re wrong. And as much as I can say, like, Oh, I’m, I’m totally open to being wrong. I am but at the same time, still my mind I have to still fight through that and go, Okay, they’re saying that and they’re saying I’m wrong. Am I really wrong? You know, there’s some times I’m not gonna lie, my pride gets in the way. And I’m like, You know what? No, I still think I’m right. So forget them. And I don’t care if it’s three people that told me that I’m wrong. I still think I’m right. But yeah, it’s it’s a pride. Pride is the downfall of us all. And I am not immune to that. I am definitely pride is the one thing that will get me a lot of times,

Andrej Zito 

where does that come from? Especially since you are so spiritual, I would assume that your ego isn’t so huge. But I?

Cyle Adair 

Who knows? Yeah, I don’t know about that. Yeah. For me, I very much believe that pride. Pride is probably one of the greatest sins, I guess you could say, like some people could talk about, like, oh, killing somebody, or lying to somebody like everybody knows that’s bad. And that’s, you know, pride is the consistent one that I think most people and that’s again, going back to my religious faith of like, why I need God, because I’m going to make mistakes all the time. And I think most people have some form of of pride. There’s lots of different ways. But sorry, I just realized I kind of forgot your question again about why Yeah, like,

Andrej Zito 

where does it come from?

Cyle Adair 

I think I think it is naturally just being human. It is the natural man. It is naturally who we are, whether it’s certain chemicals, or whatever else is going on there. I think that’s how our natural person is. But I do think to become whole and complete. We have to fight against that to become better. Good example, your health, I work out five days a week, I enjoy it. It’s my time that I physically get fit. But I also mentally, I feel like get that fit. Because I listened to good podcasts and inspiring information, good music, things like that. If if we just didn’t never work out our or eat well, for example, as well to ultimately, in the long run, we are not going to be better off, we’re going to have a lot more problems because of that. Is it easier to sit there? Is it easier to not go to the gym? Is it easier to just have a pizza rather than go? Let me cook some fresh veggies and some chicken and things like that? Yeah, it’s easier. But it’s not like, it’s not what we’re supposed to do. We’re supposed to figure out how we can elevate ourselves, you know, and to become going back to that word more whole, a better version of ourselves, you know? So we’re fighting against that on a daily basis? I know I am. And I think everybody is,

Andrej Zito 

so I’m going to assume a few things. So correct me if I’m wrong here. Your answer was kind of like, like a general thing. And I ask you about like the pride specifically about you like where does your pride come from? Is it maybe related or related to, to what you just answered that you see, maybe humans that they shouldn’t be striving to be better themselves? And maybe you are following that path? Is that maybe where the pride comes from? Like you’re doing the right thing? Like you’re making yourself a better version of yourself? Or is it related to something different that I don’t know, maybe how you were brought up?

Cyle Adair 

So I would say yes, to kind of both of those, I think it would be kind of what your first point was, is just trying to become better that pride is there because I want to become better. I don’t want to go back even though I know sometimes I take a step back, you know, in different different aspects of my life. Thinking about it. I haven’t really ever thought about this, you know, just clinic clicked when you said this. Could it be something growing up? Yeah, my dad, you know, think about it. My dad was a colonel in the military. The military, I think most people think are very disciplined people. They got their, their, they got their stuff together, you know. And so I look at that and go, Yeah, I think there probably is some things, you know, seeing my dad grow up, you know, the, and I think, I don’t know, anybody that does not think highly of my father. You know, there’s a lot of regards to it. And so I think, that pride of wanting to imitate that, in a sense of like, I can, I can be that I can I can do that too. You know, I don’t look at it, there’s definitely pride in the negative sense. I think there’s pride in the positive sense. I am prideful of my dad. He is a great person that treats people very, very well. He’s a great father, a great husband. He’s a great military leader, a great professional to and his careers. So I think there’s pride like in that, but then there’s also pride of like, oh, I don’t make mistakes, and everybody else gets in the way. And it’s everybody else’s issues, and but not my issues kind of stuff. So I think wanting to imitate that probably helps me have good and bad pride in that way. You know, I want to become like that. But at the same time, I don’t want to accept that I have probably a lot of more faults and failures, than I’d like to recognize

Andrej Zito 

one thing that I was still curious about, when you were mentioning about the support system, you mostly mentioned, your friends and your wife, would you consider your parents as a support system? Do you go talk to them about these kinds of things? Or is it not something that you’re comfortable discussing with them?

Cyle Adair 

No, no, no, absolutely. I mean, my parents we talk, they were just here two weekends ago visiting, and stayed with us. And and, yeah, I mean, I talked to my parents, about pretty much everything. But I do understand that they have different backgrounds and how they were raised as well, too. My dad didn’t, he was extremely hesitant for me starting my own company. My dad was extremely hesitant of me investing, even though for years, investing in stocks, and mutual funds, like, you know, be careful. My very first real job making real money. He was like, good luck. I don’t know, like, literally. So he is very encouraging, in a sense. But at the same time, he’s not an extrovert, he is not a risk taker in a sense. And so these things definitely play out where I have a very close relationship with them. But my I’ll never forget, I was in college, I was actually doing day trading my freshman year, in college, e trade had just rarely come out. E trade wise, they just barely, the E trade had come out. But there was the trade was only for rich people, you know, people that had 1000s and $1,000, they had a special that went on. And if you had $1,000, you could start investing in E trade long time ago. Okay, so I did that. And, and started day trading, how to 1000 bucks started day trading with that, and thankfully made it into something pretty good. But at the same time, I called up my dad, because he had been investing in some stocks or mutual funds. And so I called them up like that. I bought the stock yesterday, it blew up, it did exactly what I was hoping it was going to do. It’s more than tripled right now. And I’m like, it keeps on going up. But I keep on thinking like, you know, I think I need to sell and then just like, go find another stock, you know? And he goes, No, no, you need to stay with that stock and keep writing it you know, and keep keep going. It keeps on going up, just keep on writing it. You know, he’s not the big risk person, but he’s like telling me that I get off the phone with them. My mom calls me she knew that we were on the phone. My mom calls me afterwards and says, Hey, I know you respect your dad. And I very much respect him as well. I would not take his advice when it comes to stocks. And so I was like, okay, and knowing more, I knew a little bit, but I knew my dad definitely had some ups and downs when it came to investing in stocks and things like that. So I say that of my parents have different backgrounds and perspectives. And so that’s not always going to be like, I take their advice on a percent. But I very much talk to them about different things that are going on getting their insights, because they’re very wise people, you know, as well, too. My dad was never a business owner. My mom never my mom was pretty much a full time mom, she did part time work at a bank for a while. And she worked some other part time jobs, but like career wise, you know, when it comes to like, should you do all this stuff like, there, I’m going to talk to him about it because they’re wise and they bring different insights. But at the same time, they’re not have mentors and other people that I work with, that are entrepreneurs that have made multimillion dollar companies and have made very successful in a sense of their companies and growing you know,

Andrej Zito 

what is something that people seem to misunderstand about you? What I mean by this question is, I don’t know let’s say I meet you or people meet you. They have the initial contact with you. They think that you are this way. And then once they really get to know you they’re like, oh, Kyle is actually not like that. He’s completely opposite. Is that like first impression that you give that is actually not you or, or that could be misleading?

Cyle Adair 

I mean, kind of like what we talked about. I think there’s going to be the A surface level conversation that you have that you get to know somebody, are they really getting to know me? Probably not, you know, I’m not really getting to know them very much as well either. And it’s no knock. It’s just, sometimes it’s time you got five minutes how well you’re gonna get to know somebody and five, you know, like, Okay.

Andrej Zito 

Ask them what is their definition of being whole? Yeah, exactly, yeah,

Cyle Adair 

that’s gonna be the next. Oh, man. So that’s tough. And maybe this goes back to maybe my pride or ego or whatever. I like to think most people probably think, decently of me, you know, and I don’t give. So you know, there’s a book, emotional intelligence, I very much believe in that and look at people’s emotional intelligence. So I’m very aware. But at the same time, I just kind of know that this is, in a lot of ways who I am, there’s plenty of ways to and I’ve apologized to a lot of people, you know, you know, where I talked to them. And maybe I said something that I’m like, Oh, I was, I was just trying to be funny. And I realized that could be interpreted as maybe a little bit rude or, you know, diving in too much into the personal world, you know, without really knowing them or joking about something that they didn’t think is going to be very funny or whatever, but maybe other people did. So. Man, that’s, that’s a tough thing. So I think I definitely look at that. But at the same time, I think people, I’m not trying to please everybody, is what I’m trying to say. So there are probably going to be times that they’re like, I don’t know if I really care for that Kyle Guy. And that’s okay. I don’t want to do it. Because I’m not trying to make I don’t literally generally don’t think I have any enemies. For the most part. I don’t know. Hopefully not. Maybe I’m naive to that. But I think there are definitely people that are like, yeah, Kyle’s not really the guy that I love to hang out with, you know, Kyle’s not going to be the first person I call. And that’s okay. Like, I’m okay with that. Because I think there’s going to be other people that are gonna say, Yeah, Kyle’s a guy that I definitely want to hang out with. And you know, and do that. So I don’t know, I guess just trying to not please everybody. I think some people might say that I am a people pleaser, but I genuinely want people to be comfortable to be who they are. That’s really what I want. And does that mean that we’re going to perfectly get along? No, but I want them to feel comfortable in who they are, and not try to be something that they’re not

Andrej Zito 

is there any, I don’t know how else to call it then. tactic, how you’re trying to make people comfortable around you. Because maybe this is, again, my first impression. And this can be, again, from my own little bubble of a maybe guy that also has ego issues, but I’m also probably very insecure. So to me, you look like the perfect guy. So that could be that could be a little bit intimidating to me. So it’s like only like, like, when you start talking about like, Okay, you have fear and and you struggle with things. That’s where I’m like, okay, like, you’re coming more down to my level, like, I don’t see you like as a perfect guy. So how would you? How do you try to make other people feel you’re comfortable around you?

Cyle Adair 

I think, for me, it’s vulnerability. Now, I don’t think I don’t, I can’t think of a time that I’ve walked up to somebody and says, and said, Oh, yeah, you know, I had to spank my kids, you know, once, or whatever. Like, I’m typically not walking up to people and just like, laying out all my dirt of everywhere where I fail, you know, but I think being vulnerable and letting people know, like, I am not perfect. And it’s really hard, because I think most people hear that. I’m not perfect, you know? And they just go, yeah, yeah, but you’re, that’s what you saw. And no one’s perfect, but like, you’re way better than me, or he’s way or she’s way better than me. But I think being vulnerable to gives maybe some specifics, you know, of where maybe you did fail, you know, again, I look at my failures, and that’s the, and that’s the interesting thing. For me personally, but I probably say a lot of people have that. My biggest fear is failure. And right away, I’m being vulnerable, telling you about where my failures are, you know, and again, it’s not like a, hey, tell me about your failures. I think I think that’s like, a, that’s a good question. You know, you could probably ask, you know, where, tell me, tell me some specifics of where you’re failing, you know, so there’s that side to it. And then I think more of just relating with people, you know, when you when you see realize, you know, maybe they don’t feel as good in a certain aspect of their life to talk about like, Man, I My situation is definitely not the same. But I’ve, you know, I’ve yelled at my kids, I’ve yelled at my wife, you know, I’ve done this, I’ve done that. You can, you know, I’ve failed here I made a stupid decision and work, you know, I made this decision it cost us 1000s of dollars, you know, whatever. or it might be there’s lots of different ways, but it’s just more understanding maybe where they’re at. And for me letting know, like, I’ve made mistakes there or even at the same time, just saying, Look, I’ve made a lot of mistakes. I haven’t done one and that aspects, I wish I could relate a little bit more but failed and a lot of different other ways. You know, and hopefully, they know that’s, again, just being more vulnerable and, and just letting me know, we’re all we’re all human. We’re all making mistakes all the time. And that’s okay. That’s even though being a perfectionist, like, I still say it’s okay. But it’s the same way that I expect with my employees and myself and the people that work at transcend, is, it’s okay to make mistakes, but you better learn from it, and you better change. You know, if you don’t, then that’s probably not gonna be great.

Andrej Zito 

Are there any situations where you feel insecure?

Cyle Adair 

Yeah, I mean, I’m just trying to think of like, I think I mean, an easy one that comes to mind that is probably not very vulnerable, honestly. Because I think most people, it’s like, when I walk into a room, and I know, you know, it could be a networking event or other CEOs and I’m like, my company’s like, brand new. All you guys are making way more money than I am. All you guys like my, my pitiful excuse of talking about like, you know, hiring somebody or having think they haven’t had to fire anybody. But like, there’s lots of different things where I’m just like, they got so much more experience, and they got it all figured out. I think that’s a, that’s a common one that I feel like in a lot of different aspects. Going to church, there are certain people that I highly, highly regard that I’m like, oh, man, but I know they’re not perfect, either. But I’m still like, intimidated a little bit that I’m like, Well, they’ve never, they never like, I don’t know, whatever sin you want to think about. They never, they’ve never looked at another woman thought about that, you know, like they’re married, you know, or they’ve never, you know, there’s a lot of things on the spiritual front, the business front of going in, and being with that. I mean, I get intimidated sometimes by my wife, you know, like, in the sense of like, she’s so much better a nurturer. And I am and like, I just like sometimes when I’m with my kids, I’m like, Man, she has fun and a whole different other aspect that I wish I could have fun with my kids and could connect with. And I’m not as good as that. So I’m kind of intimidated by that, you know, a little bit. So. Yeah, so I think there’s definitely plenty of times that I get intimidated. And, but I will say it’s not like I’m always airing it out in the open, like, Hey, guys, I know I’m at this networking event. I’m the new CEO, I have no clue what’s going on. And I’m a complete idiot. So probably just avoid me because you probably won’t want to talk to me like, I’m not airing it out like that either. You know. So I guess

Andrej Zito 

my final question would be, we talked about the pride and the ego. And also you trying to, I don’t know, figure out life? Is there something that you’re trying to do with regards to your ego? Like, how, how can we control it better?

Cyle Adair 

So you said, how can we control the better? You want to control my ego? Or you’re saying like, how in general? Can everybody control their egos?

Andrej Zito 

A little bit? Yes, yes. Yes. The second one,

Cyle Adair 

ego is a little bit different than pride, in my opinion. So if I had to say ego, I think it’s going back to kind of what I said, like that vulnerability. Sharing enough, but not sharing too much. You know, you’ve heard the abbreviation TMI too much information, like, person walks in the party, and they’re like, Hey, I got hemorrhoids. And you’re like, oh, I don’t know where that came from. And I don’t know if I want to hang out with that person, because that just seems weird that they’re sharing that much. Because obviously, I think any friendship wants discretion, you know, like, no one wants, hey, yeah, they tell about their friend and all their issues and all their problems, you know. So I think it really is just that vulnerability portion helps out quite a bit, you know, the more that you’re vulnerable, the more that you’re human, it helps you first off, well, first off, I will say it helps other people understand that and see you in a different light as a human as a real individual. But at this time, hopefully, at least I one of the reasons why I share my vulnerability is it reminds me that I am human, and that I’m not perfect. I can’t expect that from anybody else. And so it kind of helps my ego, put it in check a little bit more of like, look how many mistakes you’ve made, and how many mistakes you’ll continue to make to but that’s okay. Realize that don’t, don’t hold your hold your head up high enough, but not too high, because you’re not better than anybody else. You know. So, I think vulnerability I don’t know. I’d love to get your now I’m going to switch the question there.

Andrej Zito 

The interview is over.

Cyle Adair 

What do you feel like is a way that you or that everybody is able to put their ego One check, you know what helps you to do that,

Andrej Zito 

for me, sometimes it helps. I’m not sure if this is directly related to ego or like how my ego reacts in certain situations. Like, for example, when you were previously talking about that some of the previous employees used to upset you. I think I’m like that, like, in some situation, like my immediate instant reaction is very upsetting. And it might be related to my ego, because I think that I would do it way better than that person that. So with that, in those situations, usually when I get upset, it helps to just take a step back, even sleep on it, and maybe look at it, again, like the next day when the ego kind of like cools off. And you can look at it in a slightly different and maybe more rational perspective. Because like, my brain would probably know that, yes, people are different. People have different talents, they have their strengths and weaknesses. But in that moment, it’s just all ego. So I guess, like the time I don’t know, helps a little bit. But I’m also like, in the same boat as, as you like, I’m still dealing with it. It’s not like I am the master of my ego. But I also read a book about like, the ego and how it’s like the disease of the mankind, like, like all of us has ego issues. And it doesn’t always mean that when you have ego issues that you are, like super confident, or you’re seeing yourself above others. It’s also the opposite way. If you’re feeling like you’re less than others, it’s also ego. Yeah,

Cyle Adair 

I think that’s one thing universally with a lot of different lid religions is to be in the middle, not too much. And not too little, like monks, shamans, one of our important employees is Hindi. You know, all these different religions are trying to get you to go, don’t be too much. Don’t be too little. The whole

Andrej Zito 

the whole, that’s a nice ending to the conversation. But But what I wanted to also say like to this topic is that’s what I shared in one of the maybe it’s something similar to the bootcamp that you went to I also went to some self development program here in Vancouver, it’s called landmark. I’m not sure if you know about, I think I’ve heard of it. I’ve never gone though. But yeah. And in one of the sessions, I realized that what I do, or to maybe to put it in the right way, what my ego does is that I’m always competing with everyone. And as a result, I either feel better than the person or I feel worse than the person and I’m almost never here, which is a big problem.

Cyle Adair 

Yeah, hard to, it’s hard to relate to people when you’re here or here. But it’s better, you can relate more, when you’re there in the middle, you know, us well, and we’re talking about ego in that sense. But my hope is, again, that people feel comfortable on who they are, but also inspires them not because of the way life particularly that I live, but they are just inspired to go become more and be more in their lives. And that can look like in many different aspects. Whether that’s being a better husband, father, businessman, that doesn’t matter to me, but that they want to go, you know, I can be just a little bit better tomorrow than I am today. And my hope is that that’s what I aspire to do. You know, I wish I could say I think about that every single time when I’m interacting with somebody, but it’s not really it’s just going, I hope they walk away and go, Man, that Kyle Guy, not that he’s cool, or that he’s whatever, but that it’s like, Man, I feel like I want to be a better version of me when I’m around them. And that’s, that’s gonna be my marriage advice as well to my wife definitely makes me want to be a better person. And so I don’t know if you find one of those people hanging out with those people more whether it’s a friend or whoever, hang out with those people that want that help you become a better version of you. All right,

Andrej Zito 

cool. Thank you very much for the interview. Yeah. That was nice. Getting to know you. Absolutely.

Cyle Adair 

Same, the same here. I say same here, Andre. Like, obviously, you got to ask all the question. I’m like, Man, I need to start a podcast just like the reverse that and and ask you a bunch of questions. But yeah, thank you very much for inviting me to do this. And yeah, I don’t know if if another time comes up. There you go. Let’s, let’s look at the

Andrej Zito 

talk about localization. Yeah, let’s get our hands dirty. The more you’re a type hat. Yeah, stuff talking about feelings and wholesomeness.

Cyle Adair  

But ultimately, when it’s all said and done, at least for me, like that’s what life is about, like life is about what we’re talking about right now. Business definitely needs to be mixed in there because we have to make a living we have to do those things. But these are the Important questions in life and the important things that I think everybody’s trying to figure out a little bit more. Business just happens to be a nice saying that like, Yeah, let’s talk about that and yeah, who’s who’s gonna really shame away from making more money or being a little bit more, you know, successful or feeling a little bit more success at work? No, that’s I think that’s okay. You know, all right. Great. Subscribe for part two with Kyle. Yeah, exactly. Well, Andre, thank you

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