How To Build Your Global Marketing Strategy Like a Startup

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Do you want to increase the ROI of localization? Which market will be your next and which content should you localize? Stop guessing, start experimenting. Build your global marketing strategy around constant testing and evaluating data. Listen NOW at 11:40​.

Finding the right localization partner won’t be easy. Here’s a tip to ask your potential vendors: “Hey LSP, we’re successfully selling these 10 products in North America through our website and Amazon. Our team calculated the total word count to be around 100,000 words. We want to expand to new markets (e.g. Germany, France, Spain, Japan, Korea, China). How would you advise we approach the expansion to maximize the ROI?” If you get a quote or discussion to translate 100,000 words into 6 languages, you need to keep looking.

This is episode #7 of my speaking practice, also known as the Localization Podcast 🙂 #localization​ and #translation​ news across social media delivered to you by the power of my voice.

Timestamps:
11:40​ – Startup approach to a global marketing strategy
46:26​ – The key to global e-commerce success


Andrej Zito 

This is episode number seven of the localization podcast. My name is Andrej Zito and I welcome everyone to this week’s podcast. Hello. Once again, it took me a lot of time to mentally prepare myself to press the record button. I don’t know why I always struggle with everything, you know, taking the first step. But he Ryan, I think I actually know why. Why I hesitated for so long because like, my preparation for this week’s episode is even worse than before probably I did my research, I went through the social media, mainly Twitter and LinkedIn, I went through a couple of articles, but I have zero notes. So this will be full improvisation. And by the way, I took a note when I was recording, episode number six in the last week. And I want to start this podcast by saying that this is not a professional podcast, it’s more like a hobby at this stage for me.

Andrej Zito 

And the main reason I mean, one of the main reasons why I started doing this podcast is so that I can practice speaking without a lot of preparation, you know, trying to formulate my thoughts better, because like, I don’t have that many chances at work to do this. And, yeah, so this is warning that there could be awkward pauses. I also try to like limit the amount of editing that I do. So only like when I do the post production, I sometimes like see, like, huge gaps or like when I take notes, like when I said something wrong wrong, or I know that I want to delete a certain part of the podcast. But otherwise, like the small little things I don’t do and to be honest with you, I don’t even listen to my own podcast at all. So maybe that’s something to work on in the future. So that was the first initial disclaimer that I wanted to share.

Andrej Zito 

The second thing is episode number six. Got a lot of views on YouTube. I was surprised by that a little bit. It got like, like 100 minutes of watch time, I think, like one or two days after I initially published it. Um, so yeah, I was I was quite surprised about it. Maybe maybe the sharing on social media actually worked this time, and it’s by far the the most successful podcast that I turned into a video. Also, I got a shout out from Mr. Gonzalo. So this is just to officially Thank you for helping me promote my podcast. And I hope that it will stay independent for as long as I can. Because that is definitely true. True. Like, I wanted to do my own stuff, because nobody’s there to control me or like center the center, like what I want to say. Um, so yeah, I’ll try to be independent. And, okay, where are we now?

Andrej Zito 

So I did a little bit of preparation on Thursday, because the thing is right now is that my mother is visiting me here in Vancouver. She arrived last Wednesday. And by the way, right now, it’s Sunday. It’s 10:32pm. So I’m recording this quite late. And she’ll be staying here for one week. So she’s leaving on Wednesday. So of course, I wanted to try to spend some time with her so I didn’t have that much time to do a lot of my own stuff. And then also when I finally had time, I was like feeling so super sleepy and super tired and exhausted yesterday, so I just blew the whole afternoon and evening by just falling asleep and being in a bath. So yeah, shame on me. Once again. I love My momentum when it comes to doing stuff.

Andrej Zito 

So yeah, I need to recover, which will be even more difficult because I’m leaving Vancouver in a few days. And as I mentioned in the previous episode, I’ll be going to Philippines and I’ll be working there from there for five weeks approximately. And because I finally want to have some joy in my life, and that is usually what that is usually what kind of like destroys my work momentum. I have I have, I don’t know, I’m not sure if I shared this on the podcast before. And, and I recently kind of like realize this is that like, what I have my work momentum. So when I really like try to squeeze like the maximum value out of each time and do something productive, whether it’s the actual work online or dense like working on my content. Because of that I lose kind of like a social momentum.

Andrej Zito 

So it’s more difficult, you know, to talk to people, because I’m just fully focused on like doing things and thinking and like I’m like inside of my own world. And then the opposite happens, which is what I usually realize when I go dancing Can I like it, I’m like, really like hyped about the class or something like that. Then I just like, Listen to the music after the class. After after I get hyped. I listen to the music, and I keep dancing in my head and I and I totally Can I just go back and switch to to like work mode, like doing something productive. So balancing these two aspects of my life. Which is kind of funny, because in my very first vlog that I posted on YouTube, I think I mentioned that as kind of like a unique, like, what is unique about me, and that is like the combination of the intellectual output that I do, I create.

Andrej Zito 

And then there’s the dancing part, which is like, completely not intellectual. And yeah, so these are the two things that I actually like to do. And I like really want to focus on them. And their combination is, I think, really unique worldwide. But I still need to learn how to how to balance those things so that it’s not just like, I do only one and then I have problem doing the other one. So I need to try to find a nice balance. And I’m already recording for eight minutes. And this is another long intro, which has nothing to do about the podcast. So I think we should start getting into all the topics. I did select, like the last week was like super productive, like they were like so many posts, especially on Twitter. that caught my attention. But I had more than 1010 pieces in the initial selection.

Andrej Zito 

So then I decided like I’ll probably remove some of them and try to focus on the most valuable ones, especially the ones that kind of teach me something or posts where I think I can add something extra so that I’m not just like reading someone else’s content. And also what I realized just now is that maybe it’s the last podcast gained? No, wait. I got lost again. So the last podcast I named it just by one topic. So there was like I don’t know, there is like, like main topic. And that was the title that I used in the YouTube video. And actually haven’t checked the analytics and I don’t remember if most of the traffic were when they’re through search, or through links on social media. In any case, I think it’s better if each podcast has kind of like a main topic and I’ll do the title All around topic. And I will also put that into the description.

Andrej Zito 

And what I want to change for this episode is that because I used to do it the other way, so first I just recorded like in the chronological order. Like, like how I discovered the articles, and then I just talked about it like one by one. And after I had that after I did the recording, then I was like, Okay, so this article is probably the most important one. So then I made a title around it. But I think that the first article that I’ll share in the podcast should be matching the title so that the most important topic is in the very beginning. Well, in the very beginning after the intro, and I’m already getting into the 12 minute mark. So anyway, I explained that a little bit. So without further ado, let’s get right into the most important part of this podcast topic number one. And I have two interesting articles, which are both about marketing strategy.

Andrej Zito 

So the first one is, and this is a newcomer to the podcast, it’s a company called bureau works. So it’s about bureau sb UREA, you works w rk s.com. And they have an article called tips for startups approaching global marketing strategy. Tip number one, evaluate existing international traffic. While you’re still in the preparatory stage, take a close look at the International traffic you’re already getting. Utilize sentiment analyzes to judge how your company is being talked about by international audiences on social media, then use this data to make informed decisions about where and how to localize. For example, let’s say you’re seeing large traffic spikes coming in from Germany, these people already use your product and love your brand.

Andrej Zito 

So that’s the sentiment analyzes are two different ways to move forward from this fortunate happenstance, you could release a fully localized marketing campaign in German and hope to capitalize on that momentum. Or assuming this users aren’t clamoring for a German language version of your product. You could focus localization efforts in France instead to tap a whole new population of users. Alternatively, you could do a layer of localization in German, perhaps a product tutorial or a specific marketing campaign to reach even more interested users without taxing your resources as heavily in that already successful market. The big questions you need to ask, Is there an appetite for translation in this market? The data driven approach indicates that you should focus on markets where the answer to that question is a resounding yes.

Andrej Zito 

So this is the first step. And actually, this brings me back I think, was it the first or the second episode where I already covered this topic before? And that time it was based on the reply that I gave on Reddit, I think, or somewhere else? I have no idea where and it was about how do you choose which market to to attack and where to go with your product or services. So what I like about this, this first tip is the sentiment analyzes This is something that I have never considered before and it’s something that I don’t have a lot of practical experience with. I don’t even know how it looks like. But from my very, very limited knowledge. I know this is kind of like somehow, like how your company how your product or service is taught.

Andrej Zito 

About on social media, I don’t know like how all the social how these tools called, like social media management tools or something like that. And they probably have some, some algorithms to basically judge the how you’re being viewed by the public on social media. So yes, this is another good indicator to see if you actually have customers in a certain market, which are okay, using your English version. And if you have like a limited budget, whether it might be better to use that to penetrate a different market, where you want to achieve much without localized version. And okay, so this was tip number one, and we have four more tips. So let’s get to tip number two, decide which languages matter most. Before you start translating content, you need to get laser focused on which languages are actually necessary.

Andrej Zito 

If you’re expanding service into Singapore, for instance, you could be looking at translating into at least four different languages, Malay is the most obvious, but plenty of people speak also Tamil, Mandarin, and even English. The good news is you don’t have to localize content in all of these languages in order to be successful. Instead, identify your target demographic and determine which language or speaking, plenty of census data exists to show which languages are spoken by particular segments of each of the world’s major markets. use it to your advantage. So this tape, I don’t know what extra I could add to it. I’m still thinking about the example that they gave about Singapore, which is a place where I used to live and yes, there are four official languages.

Andrej Zito 

So yeah, I guess this comes down to what they want to say. lets me know, see, and this is the problem that I get, like, mixed with conflicting thoughts. And I end up not saying anything in the end. To what I was thinking that if you are, let’s say, Well, if you’re a US company, and you want to go to Singapore, because like it’s one of the most developed markets in Southeast Asia, you could get by just with English. Or maybe you could use English as the starting point, and then see how you would do in the market. And maybe you could add extra languages based on what the data is telling you. Huh, Well, okay, I’m actually confused by my own comment, which isn’t, which I just made. So I think I’m not going to try anymore. Let’s go to tip number three, treat localization, like SEO.

Andrej Zito 

And this paragraph I have I have fully highlighted, because this is where I’m like, really like Yes, finally, somebody’s saying this. When startups enter new markets, they tend to run Full speed ahead. companies want fully localized Product Marketing and support content, and they want it in every language possible, because they’re afraid of disappointing international audiences. They want this broad reach at the same time that they want to minimize their localization spent, you can have it both ways. In order to maximize your return on investment, you need to run a marketing experiments. Yes, please and pivot according to the results, essentially treating your global marketing strategy like SEO. Want to release full blown marketing videos with voiceover in Brazilian Portuguese?

Andrej Zito 

Try releasing just one video and seeing how it performs in comparison to videos you already have in English. If 50% more People click on the Portage Portuguese version, you know, you’ve got a potential lead. That’s the end of the third tip. And this is just brilliant. I think. So I definitely, really like this. I like doing these marketing experiments, experiments and pivoting based on the results, because you can take a slower approach. Well, it’s not a slower approach. It’s more like, is it slower approach? Technically it is. But it’s because you are spending your money in a more careful way. Careful way, is that the right word? Yeah, you spending your budget more carefully. And you’re evaluating your ROI continuously, instead of doing everything at once. Which I think how everybody should be doing things.

Andrej Zito 

Unless you’re like 100%, certain that like, I don’t know, for example, like your CEO, or there’s like a corporate strategy that says, like, we want to be in the market because of whatever. Like, in 10 years, it will be a critical market. So we want to really get there like full power. And we want to give the customers the best experience from the start, because maybe we’re afraid that it would damage our brand, or something like that. But, and maybe this article is targeted more towards startups, because they do mention startups quite a lot. And the ever startups like if you have like, if you don’t have like a lot of money to blow, and you like really need to be smart about your spending, then this is definitely one way how you can go about entering new markets. So I really liked this tip.

Andrej Zito 

Tip number four, consider all your content options. First, consider entering markets where you don’t have to pay to translate content at all, then mark and the Netherlands or to international markets that might not require translation, just create localized content in English, and you’ll be good to go. Similarly, if you’re targeting Chinese Americans currently living in Hong Kong, there’s no reason to translate your content into Chinese as well save the money and focus your localization efforts elsewhere. So this is a new thing for me, like Denmark and Netherlands, I know that Dutch is quite common language, Danish, maybe not so much. And they mentioned this interesting thing, which is to which has just create localized content in English.

Andrej Zito 

So the way I understand is this, that you might still have, like, for example, like with a website, you still might have Denmark as a country, with English language in your page, and you might be targeting the people just in English. So the first thing that comes to my mind is like video where you would say, and let’s say the source called source video is content created in America, it would be a people in America. So if you want to localize this in English, for Denmark, you would just say hello, people in Denmark. This kind of this whole thing. Reminds me of Gary Vee. So Gary Vee Gary Vaynerchuk. He’s like the main guy that I’m following on YouTube, but I really like his content, which is about mainly about marketing because he’s the CEO of Vayner media, which is like a big marketing and content agency that works with fortune 500 companies.

Andrej Zito 

And he’s always about like really creating like lots of different content that’s highly contextual and highly relevant to the, to the small cohort that you create. So I’m actually thinking, and this may not be related to this article, it’s I got stuck again. Um, I know what like what I want to say is like, Okay, let me just say, for example, we have, I don’t know, lending websites, they’re like very, the landing pages that I see are like, like, quite generic. And I’m not sure if the, because we don’t do a lot of like, ad localization or like paid media localization. So I’m not sure how the local office actually handle it, whether they really go. He’s in deep water, they’re really targeting like very, very specific audiences. So and the example that I should give is, for example, let’s stick to to Denmark. And let’s say that your product is for LIKE IT professionals.

Andrej Zito 

So you can say, hey, IT professionals in Denmark, are you looking for XYZ? And you can say, Hey, are you 20 year old, IT professional from Denmark? This video is for you. So this is a more targeted version of an ad, or, or or a copy that you might have. And I’m thinking this may be actually the first business idea that I’m sharing here on podcast. Because I know that like Gary Vee creates a lot of these different small, different versions like for each smaller cohort, because like, the more targeted it is, it should be converting more. So for example, instead of saying like, hey, buy these new Fuck, how is it called the beep for the babies? Oh my god. It’s diapers. I couldn’t remember the word diapers. So the second example I wanted to give is like, Hey, are you looking to buy diapers?

Andrej Zito 

So that would be like a very generic version, which Gary Vee refers to us by any law? And you could say, hey, young monitors in Denmark? Are you looking to buy diapers? Or you could say, Hey, are you 25 year old monitor? In Denmark that’s looking for local diapers or something like that. So all these different versions, and then you could create, like, I don’t know, 10 or 20 different versions based on like a certain age, and stuff like that. So I’m wondering if like anyone in localization actually has customers like this, that give them like, a lot of different options, because I have not seen anything like that. Like where the where the word advertising would be super, super targeted at like a very small niche groups, instead of going very broad. And so that brings me to this business idea.

Andrej Zito 

Is there actually anyone in localization industry that’s actually doing? Very Hmm. Hmm. Thinking? No, that’s probably a stupid idea. Well, well, if your customer gives you like 25 different versions of an ad that’s highly targeted in English, then you would probably just do the same thing as you’re doing right now, even if you’re not familiar with this type of super targeted marketing. But the idea that I was thinking about before was that like, should there be like someone who’s like specializing, like, in like doing like really good, highly targeted? Local, paid media? I’m not sure. I’m actually wondering who actually does SEO and paid media localization very, very well. Anyway, I got a little bit sidetracked. So that was that was that was number four, right? was number four?

Andrej Zito 

No, no, it was just number three. Wait, what? No. That was number four. And I didn’t even finish it. Because there’s the there’s the last paragraph. And this is about consider all your content options. So another option is to create content from scratch in your target languages, instead of paying a premium for translation. Think about it, instead of paying 1000s of dollars to translate thick ebooks, and white papers for every target market, you could just write a new piece of gated content in each of those key languages. This realization alone will help downsize your localization efforts and increase your ROI. So that still kind of goes back to the tips before, and that is deciding on languages and doing experiments. So instead of going crazy, and localizing everything, you just want to test things.

Andrej Zito 

Oh, actually, no. Because this option is, and this is actually an interesting approach, which is again, something new that I’m learning. And that is to actually create content from scratch. Instead of paying premium for translation, hmm. So Hmm, okay. So how would it work? in practice? Because they’re the example that they gave us that data want you to pay 1000s of dollars to translate thick ebooks, and white papers. But I would assume that if you have an E book or white paper, it exists on let’s say, some website. So then, again, it’s kind of like the previous tape, which is like to experiment. So you could first translate something smaller, and then see if you actually need to translate a bigger thing. But how would it compare to actually creating new content from scratch? Is that actually something that is being done?

Andrej Zito 

Maybe, for example, like if like a condom is like, needs to be like, very customized, and I think, in Autodesk, we used to call it like counter vacation. Like if there are like certain features that was related to software, then you would need to do this counter vacation. So certain features would only be usable by a certain language version in a certain market. So yeah, maybe if there are like a lot of changes to certain content that it might be better to just create something from scratch. But I’m still internally struggling with this tip. Because ebooks and white papers, I mean, hmm. Okay, I think it would come down to testing again, because like if you created an E book or a white paper, for let’s say, your main language, let’s say it’s English. And it you can see that it actually creates a value for the customers.

Andrej Zito 

Then maybe you want to experiment, how a translated version would do on target markets. But yes, I agree again that if it’s like a big ebook, you don’t want to spend all the time. Unless of course ebook is the main thing that you’re selling, then probably it would make sense to, to translate it if it’s the main content. Okay, anyway, I don’t know how to express my thoughts in a clear way. So let’s move on to the final tip, which is, start small, and plan for growth. So translate small things first, such as your app store description, and the short promo videos accompanying, consider overlaying translated subtitles on a software tutorial tutorial. Rather than doing the entire voice over from scratch, set up localization tiers, whereby certain markets get the full meal deal, that is website support content and fully localized videos, while others just get the website it’s better to have something better than nothing.

Andrej Zito 

And your lack of Hungarian support content isn’t likely to eliminate any of your potential customers while you work on catching up. shorting small also means you won’t risk putting all of your eggs into one localization basket. If Hungary turns out not to be the right market for your product, you’ll be really glad you didn’t spend half your budget localizing content in Hungarian before the official launch. So this is again. So this is again, the whole principle of testing, making smaller steps and evaluating and pivoting all the time. So it’s kind of repetition. But this is like a nice summary. And this is not a like a tip. This is another tip number six, but this is kind of like the closing section. And it says Keep Calm and use the data.

Andrej Zito 

Marketing isn’t all or nothing, you notice. yet so many companies operate under the assumption that when they go global, they have to hit new markets full force with all the translated content all at the same time. The truth is, most language service providers love that attitude. clients who believe this assumption put countless dollars into lsps already deep pockets. With no one the wiser. We’re not interested in the hoodwinking startups into paying for content they don’t need. That’s why we always encourage our clients think critically test the waters and use data to plan a trajectory that’s both cost efficient and effective. Look for a localization partner who will keep you on track with the right support team you’ll develop a global marketing strategy strategy that’s going to seriously high rate of success and even higher ROI so I definitely definitely would put by word behind this this closing section and Yep, test the waters and use the data. I love that approach.

Andrej Zito 

And I just wished it more companies would be actually willing to do that. It’s funny because like with all the with all the global pressure to decrease localization costs I have actually not seen many approaches which would be like hey, let’s try to test the market like with something smaller or even going more micro and testing different like basically a be testing translated content, something that’s like highly visible and highly converting like titles or something like that. So yeah, it’s already 43 minutes in the recording. So I just started with the first article. And I’m not done yet actually. So because this is like a new company and once again, it’s called bureau works at a no why such a name, but okay. So I also wanted to do like a quick review of their website so that I have more opportunities to comment on someone’s design choices, which is something that I really, really enjoy doing a lot.

Andrej Zito 

And I guess that this doesn’t convert the best into a podcast form, but at least I’ll try to explain myself so that you can understand it. So I’m looking at the homepage of bureau works. And their main value proposition is that it’s the hub or orchestrating content delivery globally. And subtitle is, well, it’s not subtitle. The text right underneath it is getting content your international markets doesn’t need to be disjointed and overwhelming. Bureau works puts you back in control by by aligning your people content and processes all in one platform. Stop managing the chaos and start building a comprehensive global content ecosystem. Okay. So what does it do? It unifies every localization project flowing through a single platform, no matter how it was sent. It integrates through API with Adobe Experience manager, GitHub, Zendesk, slack and much more.

Andrej Zito 

You can collaborate and you can automate streamline, you can streamline in market review, hold people accountable. What does it mean we’re tired of the black box mentality? Okay, I like that the bureau works moves you into open book engagements with your vendors and translators drill down from high level quality data to see exactly what choices people are making when it translators lsps are your own stuff, drive fact based conversations and avoid the he said she said so common in the language industry? Okay. So I guess like everything is tracked, like within the platform, which is no different than using a general a ticketing system. Merge global content flows. Okay, so everything goes. Blah, blah, blah. So here are declines. Uber, nice. Harley Davidson, Mozilla, Porsche, Burger King. CloudFlare, Phillips, Mercer. swaggin, Pfizer. Huh. Pretty nice.

Andrej Zito 

And their website is also very nice. I think it looks very clean. Okay, I’m done. Maybe I should just finish the episode here. Maybe Actually, I should do it. And because it’s already 1115? What if I actually created this one whole episode just about one thing? Actually, let me do one more article, because this is the one that I wanted to. Kind of like, see, I’m losing my words. It’s not a good time. So the second the article, I think in the in the beginning, I mentioned that I want to kind of like named a podcast by like the main team. And so for that main team, which is like marketing strategy, or how however you want to call it I had two articles. So that was the first one. And the second one. Let’s get into it. It’s, again, a new company called pay vision. I haven’t mentioned them on this podcast yet. And let me open the article. And this one has also some nice statistics.

Andrej Zito 

This is not fully related to localization services, because the way I understand is the pay vision gives you the opportunity for global payments. There are kind of like you can customize them for for different market. So anyway, I’ll be quickly going through the article from pay vision, and then once we’re done we’ll have a look at the website of them. Pay vision. So first the article starts mentioning how big the e commerce is. And they say with online shopping only growing, the number of cross border purchases will skyrocket in the next few years. We took a closer look into the stats from last year and also for 2023. So this is the first charge which I’m going to try to interpret for you. So Global eCommerce has 2018. I don’t know why they say 2018. If this article is hopefully from 2019, MB solar doesn’t matter.

Andrej Zito 

So 2018, worldwide, 2 billion people are doing e commerce in 2023. It should be 4.2 billion. That’s a lot. And in Europe, currently 2018 its 418 million users in 2023, they anticipate 553 million users. While most of the focus tends to fall on larger regions, such as Asia, Europe is by no means left in the dust. Even though the EU will see relatively mild growth in e commerce user base, the shoppers from those regions will be spending over 70% more than they do now. So the question is, how do you get your business ready for a wider audience that wraps around the globe? The key is localization. Of course. So Bryce Okay, so let’s get down to the details and find out how you can harness a local approach. And watch your conversation so or, number one, because soukous speak your customers language.

Andrej Zito 

The first and possibly easiest point to tackle is offering your website experience in the languages your customers speak. Do a little user research in house or with an external agency or tool to find out who your biggest audiences are? Then test out your conversion rates with dosed up languages, add it to your website? Okay, I’m thinking like, how does this tape compared to what we just read before? And yeah, I think this is this, even though it’s like a very short tip they’re focusing, they’re saying this out your conversion rates? Okay. I’m thinking too much now. And I don’t know what to say. Yeah. So what I’m thinking is that your conversion rates, let’s say you have ecommerce site, so you have different conversion rates or goals. Is that correct? Or no? I mean, technically you can, you can have like the you can be like collecting leads.

Andrej Zito 

And just collecting emails, although I guess like the most important conversion rate is basically just selling your stuff. So then going back to the article that we covered before the first one, you could technically test your conversion rates, if you just focus on localizing. The main part in the funnel. person makes sense. Let’s say let’s say like your website is like, we have these product products. Then you have the product page, then you can buy and then you have the whole checkout and payment process. But you also have like pages like about us. Maybe some resources, maybe walk and stuff like that. So maybe first thing If you want to be very cost efficient, maybe you just want to first localize the product page, and the whole checkout the checkout process. And maybe localizing like about us or like block is not that important.

Andrej Zito 

Because maybe like, you just first want to test if there’s like interest for your product, which means you can drive the traffic through paid instead of having to localize the blog post and waiting for your organic reach to kick in. Okay, number two from pay visions article is deliver a user experience that makes them feel at home. This is something interesting, and something new for me. And so they say, maybe Chinese shoppers prefer a red background over blue. I didn’t know about it, or your Italian customers might want more detailed product explanation than visitors from the US. I also had no idea about that. And let’s say like, Is this like something that’s actually like, verified by someone? because technically, like all the time, all the time, whenever we get like us source for translation, you probably don’t add extra copy intelligence on top of that.

Andrej Zito 

So does it is it normally like the local offices that would add something extra on top of it? If it’s actually true that Italian customers might want more detailed product explanation than the US visitors? I don’t know. Does any localization company actually do this? Because like, I have never thought about this before. But like all of the translation or localization service providers, they say that they’re the experts. But this is the first time that I’m seeing something like that this. So if everybody’s such an expert, would you actually go back to your client and say that hey, for Italian This is not enough. We need to add extra extra sentences to the detailed product information. Is that actually happening? I have no idea. Ay ay ay ay and b, A, B. Oh my god, I didn’t even know how to read this.

Andrej Zito 

And I’ve been talking about a B testing all time. Okay, a B testing is a great way to find these things out with concrete data points, you can take action on your website content and design. In Europe, for example, the top shoppers in the market have some clear favorites. First, we look at which European countries make the most online purchases. Then we delve into where they prefer to shop from the seed results below. So which countries do European online shoppers buy from? And number one is China 95% of your buys from China. I was surprised today actually buy like from Alibaba or, or what? And in the list, I’m missing Czech Republic and so IKEA. So okay, 73% of Europe buys from United Kingdom 55% from Germany 27% from us, and 40 14% of Europe buys from France. So the article continues.

Andrej Zito 

Clearly, Europeans buy a lot from Chinese sellers, which probably isn’t surprising for most of us. But the UK and Germany and to a lesser extent France are big hitters too. So if you got ecommerce operations from any of these three countries, you might want to localize your website in the languages of your most frequent shoppers. Need a tip on how to start out with UX research? Take some time to browse websites of the big names from these popular ecommerce countries and see what you like and don’t and which languages they offer. Chances are they’ve already done plenty of user research to give customers what they’re looking for. Okay, tip number three, optimize your SEO for a better conversation with each other. Audience

Andrej Zito 

So so what is this SEO website analyzes updating the meta descriptions of your company, optimizing keywords on your website can really boost your ranking. Once you adapt your SEO Marketing through each specific country audience, you find a more engaged customer base. Okay, so those are basics. And here is number four, which is something that’s relevant for them. And this is where they’re where they’re basically going to promote their service. And that is offer familiar payments experience, which is definitely important for the for localization. So what’s another way you can go local and improve your conversion conversion, letting them pay their way, no matter what payment method they prefer, we looked into shopper tendencies with languages and currencies, and found some pretty interesting stats.

Andrej Zito 

72% of shoppers spent most of their time on websites in their own language, and 45% don’t feel comfortable when they can pay in their own currency. Okay, so here is here more numbers. So 73% of shoppers want to pay in their local currency. 58% of users don’t feel confident hitting the buy button on websites not in their own language. 70 to 72% of shoppers spend most or all of their time on websites in their own language. 45% of shoppers feel uncomfortable purchasing in a foreign currency 60% rarely or never buy at English language sites. And here is the pitch. Working with a payments processor like pay vision, who has got a solid mix of ways to pay is a great way to boost your revenue, with 80 Plus Local payment methods in 150, plus currencies for customers to choose from. getting on board with a PSP.

Andrej Zito 

So is it like what payment service provider who’s got a global acquiring network doesn’t just mean you’ll be able to expand into new regions. You’ll also be able to count on an international psps expertise when it comes to payment regulations in local markets. On top of that, with local payment processing, you enjoy better interchange fees and exchange rates. And their final section. Their final paragraph is so similar to the one we had before and it says start small then scale up. With localization, it’s all about starting small and finding out what works best for your business. So work and investment in localization take you these initiatives need some time and resources but the results are worth it. You can look forward to an improvement in customer experience leading to higher trust in your business and giving you a wider audience and boosted market share.

Andrej Zito 

Okay, so a lot of general mumbo jumbo but they say start small and scale up which is perfect. Which is just perfect. Okay, so let’s go to their website, which is pe vision.com. And they say that they get it. So their value proposition is payments and we get it Okay. What’s your business evolve in new markets around the globe with our straightforward payment solutions? The world of transactions demands processing that’s flexible, conversion focused and data driven. So let’s get to it. I’m actually now thinking like, doesn’t like PayPal handle it? Or stripe? Like I would be surprised like if people didn’t have like any support for leg local payment methods. Okay, so what else did they say on their website? Everything you need on one platform set up shipped anywhere in the world.

Andrej Zito 

Okay, moonwalk cross channels sell on every touchpoint from desktop to All while to point of sale, we’ve got you covered. Make it rain, step up your sales and by accepting all major card brands, and over at alternative payment methods, no magic, just data, we’ve got your eyes on the prize. That’s why we put data in the driver’s seat of our solutions. So you can look forward to improve visibility, higher revenue and smart payments. Okay, there’s some reports start accepting payments with pay vision. Okay, so that’s it. Their website is kind of clean. It’s quite colorful, I actually like to. Okay, so where are we now in the recording? Oh, it’s just past one hour now. Not only the first two articles, and it’s already 1133. So I’m just going to look at what I have left. And there’s one article but chatbot.

Andrej Zito 

Article, how to optimize your website for local SEO, recruitment day in a lot of software. Luckily, she’s an engineer. What is the difference between freelance translator or translation agency? And then there I found this one. Interesting. Company. Okay, I think I’m going to cut it now. And maybe I’ll do another episode. Soon. Or actually, now that I did the preparation, maybe I could do episode eight, and have it ready in advance. Because I will get to Philippines. I will arrive on Friday evening in Philippines time. So then Saturday, which is typically where I record a podcast, but maybe I’ll be busy setting up things and doing something else. So maybe I could do the recording. Like let’s say so tomorrow, I’ll be doing the copy for the release. Tuesday I publish it. And yeah, maybe I could record Tuesday or Wednesday. And do a quick edit.

Andrej Zito 

Maybe as I’m traveling, we’ll see. Anyway, maybe it will be also interesting to basically just test if, what if maybe I should just do like shorter episodes for the podcast? Would it be better, like maybe I will have like more content on YouTube, more videos, shorter ones. And they will be more targeted towards the title and the description. So basically, I think better SEO and maybe lead to better engagement and audience retention. So these are things that are going through my head. And oh, gosh, I would like to talk more about marketing and all these things. But this is a localization podcasts, so I’ll need to focus. Okay. It’s 1136. Thanks, everyone for listening. Today was just two articles. But I think we went deeper into the topic. And I really liked the content, especially from the first one, which is bureau works. So check them out. And that’s going to be it and I’ll talk to you in one week. Bye.

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