Indonesian Virtual Assistant from Halosis, L10N on Social

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iFlytek to build speech recognition in China. DeepL better than Google and Microsoft? Startup Halosis from Indonesia makes online selling easier. Translating judgments in India. EU approves the use of remote interpretation. Localization on social media – Facebook, Reddit, LinkedIn and Twitter. This is episode #4 of my speaking practice, the Localization Podcast

Timestamps:
1:59​ – iFlytek raises $400M USD for China’s speech recognition
2:48​ – new CEO of deepL and what do they do?
6:04​ – Indonesian Virtual Assistant Hana from Halosis
12:07​ – Legal translation in India
12:46​ – EU green lights remote interpreting services
14:13​ – Localization on social media
24:08​ – How to get your localization team hired
39:28​ – Venga Global shares their best HR practices
48:08​ – RWS Moravia on UX localization


Andrej Zito 

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to episode number four of the localization podcast. This one may be pretty quick one. I was going over the Slater articles. Earlier today, I actually went to white spot, restaurant for the first time, that’s where I had my lunch. And I was going over the articles. And actually, this week, most of them were very, they were very much focused on, you know, business and who is like a new CEO and stuff like that. So among the five or six articles that were published in the last week on Slater, I think only one kind of caught my attention. And it’s not even about what the article said, what was related to localization, but it’s more more about what the company actually does. And I discovered something new that I didn’t know was happening. And it’s more about the technology rather than localization.

Andrej Zito 

So that’s that I think most of the content in this episode will be about social media. Because there are some news, there were some interesting posts that caught my attention during the week, and that I also kind of like interacted with. So with that being sad, let’s start with later. And I’m going to quickly go over all the articles, even though I don’t have a lot of commentary about them. And now I will explain to you why. article number one, state sponsored speech recognition, China’s iflytek raises 400 million USD in private placement. So this was, again, one of the typical Slater articles about m&a. And this is basically just like a government selected company that does something about speech recognition. And it’s kind of like the government’s vision to enhance the voice integration in their government services, you could say that way.

Andrej Zito 

And their investment will go towards research. There were not many details. So I’m going to move on to the next one. The next one was about the new CEO for deep, l, that’s actually a company that does machine translation. And once again, they were there were not too many details. I mean, nothing like practical for for for us, for me, in my perspective. And the important thing from this article was that actually, I went to their site, and you can just go there, it’s deep l.com I think that stands for for deep learning. And they had like a lot of references on their website, it kind of looks like Google translator, like you can just input some of the languages and it will give you translation back. And what did I want to say? Yeah, like most of the many of the references actually said that they’re the quality of their output of their machine translation is actually better than the one from Google or from Microsoft.

Andrej Zito 

And there were also statistics that their website it’s kind of like, number 1100 on Alexa is ranking and if I’m not mistaking, like Alexa ranks is like basically says which websites are the most visited in the world? And I think like you know, like number one spots like the top spots would be Netflix, Facebook and YouTube and Google probably in the first place. So then I was like curious, like, like, why are they so so on top and that’s when I actually discovered that like, like regular people can go to their website and just ask for translations and there and there kinda like business model is that that they offer the machine translation to, to freelancers or small lsps and You can integrate it with your cat tools. Or you can, oh, there was actually like, I think, like the main user interface that’s on their website.

Andrej Zito 

And I think maybe that gives you like, unlimited amount of translations. That’s kind of like copy, paste, you know, like, plain text, but their subscription based plans included, like document translation. So I guess you can also upload a file straight away, and you should get the machine translated file back. And, and for this type of service, they actually have kind of like a limit. So you need to increase your plans, you have like, I don’t know, their tiers, or like, I don’t know, 2020 documents a week or a month, then 100 documents a week or month and stuff like that. So that was that about deep L. So again, nothing interests think. And then the third article was the one that I kind of like, selected that caught my attention. And it was about an Indonesian startup that has to do with natural language processing. And it’s based in Indonesia.

Andrej Zito 

And it was once again labeled as m&a article because they raised $1.2 million. But the interesting thing for me and this is something that I have never seen before I think I’m trying to remember Yeah, this was something new because they basically offer and here like the quote the article, to a year old Hello, CES offers virtual assistant services to more than 3000 of Indonesia, micro, small and medium enterprises. And their chatbot is called Hannah, which is kind of funny because that’s the name of our co founder goes my bad and our article says Hannah Hello sis chat bot receives and processes orders and perform stock management tasks in Bahasa Indonesia and English for its mainly female clientele. On the back end, it connects with various services such as messaging applications, courier partners, e wallet applications and banking to accommodate online transfer transactions.

Andrej Zito 

So actually, I went to their website to see like, how it actually looks like in reality because so far, I think I mentioned this like in the first or second episode that I have like a very limited experience localizing chatbots and the chat bots were usually kind of like you know, like you get the pop up in bottom right? And you can like ask some questions. But when I went to the website of Hello sis their screenshots were I think like they’re actually let me go to their websites so that I’m not just trying to remember stuff because I went through this earlier today and they’re kind of like unique value proposition on their website was actually talking about Instagram loading the website Yeah, this is their their actually their main tagline is sell your products in Instagram easily. So this is not just like a chatbot that you have on your website but this is chatbot that works on social media.

Andrej Zito 

So I guess like if you’re selling on Facebook, on Instagram, I saw screenshots from WhatsApp as well. So this is kind of interesting I think I didn’t know that like chat bots are this virtual assistants are integrated at this level. So yeah, I can definitely see like a usage of this. And the chatbot is available in like 10 Indonesian dialects and English. And I guess that like if the if the conversation is pretty simple, and you can also make order through basically chatting with the with the chat bot and then the template, I guess automatically places an order looks at the the inventory and the stock. And it processes the payments as well. So this is, this is really something you did, I discovered, I didn’t know about it. So from in terms of in terms of localization, I’m trying to think like, if there would be a different approach than what I did, and which was basically just translate like a bunch of strings.

Andrej Zito 

And of course, NLP is important to understand what the, what the customer is saying, probably based on certain key words in the sentence and then providing the answers from the whole, collect a list of translations that you have. So this one goes a little bit further, because it can also allow you to, to date to take orders. But from the liquidation perspective, I don’t think that anything changes that much. But I really liked the idea of this start up, I’m not much I’m not sure if there’s any series that I’m actually using on a day to day basis that uses applications like this, because usually I usually order Well, I’m just talking about important. Okay, article number four, this one was totally like off because it’s about Supreme Court of India begins translating judgments into Indian languages.

Andrej Zito 

So, okay, they’re starting to translate something, nothing, nothing important. In the last article, there’s one one translation report about life sciences. So that’s, I think it’s a paid one, if I’m not mistaking. Some that’s not something I can cover. And the last article for real is about EU, and says that EU gifts in principle greenlight to use of remote interpreting platforms. So this was, again, an article that I don’t have much to say about. And it was basically about like, it used to be standard that for interpretation, you would need the interpreter to be pretty much on site. And now I guess, you is saying that it would be okay to use remote interpreting platforms, which basically means that you have like a cloud solution where there’s probably an interpreter connected somewhere around the world, and he gets the audio feed, and he immediately interprets into a microphone, and it’s transmitted through internet back to the person who needs the translation.

Andrej Zito 

Well, as I said, I’m not very, I’m not very experienced in the area of interpretation. So not much I can add there. So that was Slater. This was pretty quick. And let me let me go to the social media. And there were a few things. So Facebook, I just went there to see if there’s something happening, but there’s absolutely nothing happening. That one group that is on Facebook, which is about localization is pretty much that there’s not much activity happening. Then I can talk a little bit about Twitter. I was just going over to hash tag posts. Just before I started recording this podcast, and not much caught my attention, because most of the articles are like, hey, like what is translation? Hey, what is localization? So it’s not very relevant for me.

Andrej Zito 

What stood out for me was that I think that last lap That is Oh, yeah. Last episode I mentioned to you this one gaming company and I just forgot their name. How are they called? I think it’s July. Oh, let me look at my history. Oh, doo doo doo doo doo doo doo doo. Now I can’t find it, guys, I cannot find it. How is it possible? What is it one language? Oh level up? Yeah, that’s the name of the company level up. So I mentioned to you that they create quite a lot of content. And it’s a very, very good interesting content about game localization. So I really like they are content strategy, like the amount of content that they put is, is is is just amazing. I think they put more content than morava. And landbridge actually haven’t seen that much content on social media from these two giants.

Andrej Zito 

So props to the small NGC. I think they’re in Germany or somewhere, I don’t know. But the fact is that last time I mentioned to you that their images are not optimized for social media, so many times the text is truncated, because they posted in 16 to nine format. So it doesn’t work on social media very well. And I did actually dm them. But I didn’t get any reply back. So I was trying to look for the for the CEO, I found him on. I’m not sure every CEO, but he’s like founder on LinkedIn. And I couldn’t message him. Because I need to premium because he’s not in my close network. And then I tried to find him like on Twitter, but I couldn’t. But I think his account was like disabled or something like that. I had no idea to contact him to make sure that he’s aware of this, because I guess he’s not the one who’s managing the social media. But that’s about that.

Andrej Zito 

And the second thing on Twitter, it was interesting because it had a it was a Vimeo video. And I was surprised because it was about payment for translation companies or localization companies and translators. And it’s a it was a promotional video from Cambridge global payments. And Cambridge global payments is actually not focused on localization industry at all. Because if you go to their website, which is Cambridge fx.com, their main headline is your bridge to the world innovative payment technologies that connect you to success. And their main, like areas are payment technologies, currency risk management and industry solutions. And the reason why I bring this up is that I really like that they first of all, I was like, wondering, like why these guys are posting to to localization.

Andrej Zito 

And because, of course, in our industry, like you have to process payments, like with people around the world, so it kind of fits. But But localization, industry is not like their only focus. So what I like about their video was that it was very targeted, like they were really targeting localization. And in their video, you could see like, I don’t know, text, which was targeted to translators to localization vendors, localization companies and stuff like that. So it was it was a it was a very good demonstration of how your messaging on social and in general, your marketing should be targeted to the, to the audience. So good job for that. That was Twitter. That was Twitter. Okay, we have two more and that will be your Reddit and LinkedIn where most of the things happened. So I’ll start with trying to find the right position for this.

Andrej Zito 

Let me start with Reddit. So or run it on Reddit. And this is the I’m talking about the localization subreddit, we got a new mod. And to do let me try to go to this subreddit. Yeah. So he became a mod six days ago. And he made a post where he introduced himself, he said that he started as a translation student moved to engineering. And most recently, he’s building a localization program and sales. And he said that he will try to make the subreddit like, more live and open for discussion. And like, every week, he’ll try to post some, something interesting. And he also asked, he kind of like, encouraged the Reddit community to introduce themselves. So it was only two people that responded. That was me. And then it was one other guy. So not a lot of feedback there. So we’ll see. We’ll see how this subreddit continues to, to live on.

Andrej Zito 

And yeah, actually, my reply to that was, like, I introduce myself, like, like how long I work in the industry. But I also mentioned that like, recently, and I think I did this like after, after the last episode, so this would be like a new thing for you. Because I was so pissed about the localization subreddit, because like, it has, like so many. top of the funnel posts, which basically means that it’s like links to companies websites, where they like, create an article like, hey, why you need localization. And please come to our site and subscribe to our newsletter, or contact us or blah, blah, blah, you know, stuff like that. So only recently back of the subreddit is more about discussion, which I think it should be. And I mentioned in my reply, in my introduction to die, like, recently created the subreddit, which I called localization, no BS, where I wanted to post my own stuff, post some questions that I have.

Andrej Zito 

And really just keep it clean, and just people basically discussing and exchanging their experience, and not allowing any marketing links or content to be in the subreddit. So I’m going to see how the localization subreddit continues to evolve. And based on that, I’m going to either continue being active there, or I’m going to try to push some more content into my own subreddit. And the second interesting think, and there was like a lot of discussion, wealth, a lot of discussion, mainly between me and Opie, and also the mod because he was the one who provided an answer. And this was about a guy who said that he’s having trouble getting companies to hire his team. And he said, I have a large team of language specialists that have a strong background in localization for several different industries focusing on tech primarily, my outreach consists of reaching out to companies that either have a localization strategy in place, or just starting out.

Andrej Zito 

I introduce our team as a first responder team, used when companies pursue a new language and need to get started since they are still being building their internal teams for that specific language from the ground up, or to help build the team from scratch. Am I doing something wrong here or I need to rethink things because I sense hesitation from companies that I am reaching out. I know this is a hard sell, but the value proposition is there. Our pricing is competitive. We have the experience and do quality work. So my question is, as localization professionals, this might offering have legs? Or am I off here any help or guidance on how I can improve my value proposition would be amazing. And, okay, let me get some water. And my reply to this guy was that I was the second one to reply.

Andrej Zito 

And so the first person who replied was the was the new moderator of the subreddit. And he made pretty good points that selling in our industry is a lot about having good relationships. And sometimes it’s about knowing the people rather than being better at delivering quality. So this is my reply. And because it’s my reply, I’m just going to quote this for you and what I said. I said, I’m just to add on top of it, so that’s on top of the, the other person’s reply, I’m not sure if you’re knocking on the right door, from your message, I understand that one, you kind of manage a team of translators and to you’re trying to pitch to clients. So by that mean, I mean, buyers of translation and localization services. In my experience, clients either work with localization mlvs, or a mix of internal external linguists, I assume your team is multilingual, if you’re pitching as a team of mo translators, or regular LSP has the advantage of providing a localization service versus just just translation.

Andrej Zito 

If I had to pick between a bunch of translators, or an experienced LSP, I would choose the latter one because their services are more scalable. Have you tried contacting lsps? Do you have any regional specialization eg Asian languages, if you’re covering languages across the globe without any particular niche, then it might make more sense to position yourself as a small LSP assuming you know a bit of localization and can provide more value to potential customers. Last but not least, how does your sales process work? Do you have any previous experience and success in this area? What are the companies saying that makes you since hesitation, it’s not a matter of one visit? Maybe the issue is in your value proposition maybe you can’t sell and don’t know it takes time could be both.

Andrej Zito 

I also have a long experience in the industry. But I suck at sales, which is kind of true. You can either improve on your own or partner with someone who is better at it. So after after my initial comment, I got a response from Opie and he actually said that they are a seasoned team. And he has been in sales for 20 plus years. Which to me kind of kind of doesn’t stack up because like if you are in sales for many years, like would you really come to Reddit to ask for advice on whether your sales process and your value proposition is correct and why your potential? Customers are not saying yes to your offer. To me that sounds weird. And then he confirmed that they actually done localization projects for different industries. So they’re not just a bunch of translators, as I initially fought from the from the original post.

Andrej Zito 

And this is this is this is where he kind of made it more. not complicated, but he made it more question. He made it more. He made it questionable. For me. I mean, wait, and there we are. So so this is what he said. Our sales process is helping our future partners identify what their localization needs are, identify an execution plan that makes sense and get the yes so we can get to work. Our approach is always we are a resource first. It is important for our partners to see us as an extension of them might not be the most aggressive approach but it’s the one we are comfortable with. So this is where some of the words kind of struck me. And I’m again, questioning whether this guy really has 20 plus years in sales. And once again, I’m going to repeat the reply that I put on Reddit, word by word. So this is what I said, it’s going to be a long replay.

Andrej Zito 

Gotcha. Then maybe it’s about the wording. Large theme of language specialists. Sounds way different to me then seasoned team who did complex localization projects, the latter being more promising, of course. Also, I’m just curious, how come you work together for so many years? But you’re questioning your sales process just now? Did you decide after so many years to incorporate now, and somehow you work together before as freelancers or co workers. So this is where I’m quoting him identifying localization needs, planning and delivering. This was their, like their value proposition. Nice it, I assume that’s what pretty much every LSP is promising. Everybody wants to understand the customer, deliver quality within time and budget, blah, blah, blah. What’s your secret sauce, what makes you special.

Andrej Zito 

Other wording that could be just me resource first, that makes you a commodity. To me, the word sounds like you can be easily replaced. partners and relationships last longer and mean more to both parties. In fact, one of the reasons why you won’t be getting work is the existing relationships your prospects have, there are plenty of young dynamic companies that could deliver higher quality for a cheaper price. But clients will stick to their traditional partners, who are slow as fuck to innovate and insight. That’s the reality. And it just confirms what the other user said, you need to build relationships. And this is my final conclusion. or suggestion, identify your unique value, find the right prospects and focus on relationships? And then he replied that, no, that’s the holy grail right here. Thank you.

Andrej Zito 

Um, so yeah, so what I was basically trying to point out with these three things is that identify your unique value, you know, like, if you are like a new localization team, or whatever, like a team of translators. If you just want to say that, you want to be there for the client, and you want to understand their needs, and you want to deliver on time, and you can you want to be like a reliable partner for them. That’s nothing special, you know, because everybody pretty much offers the same that’s kind of like a standard expectation. I mean, like, you wouldn’t say that you don’t want to be there to understand the client, and you would just do whatever you want, right? So if you’re new, you need something to make you stand out over the competition. So that was the first thing.

Andrej Zito 

Second thing was find the right prospect. And what I mean by that is try to try to look for companies that would be more open, or where the chance of them saying yes, is more likely than with other companies, for example. If you are like a small LSP, you probably you wouldn’t go knocking on the door of Microsoft’s internal localization team or Google’s location, or Amazon, you know, these big companies, they already have established. The whole localization, they have their preferred vendors and blah, blah, blah. So if you’re new, and if you don’t have like anything special, and that goes back to the, to the secret sauce, you probably don’t stand a chance.

Andrej Zito 

So you might want to focus on some companies that like, don’t have a lot of experience with localization or don’t do any localization at all or you know that they do it very poorly and you can make me like pointing out from there from Let’s say the way the way their website is localized, you can like identify like issues or like how they do their social media. And you can just come there and say, Hey, you guys are doing this wrong, you should do it this way, because of this, and this, and this, this will be your benefits. And we can help you with that. And the final thing is, of course, focus on relationships. So what I was just saying is like, point out the benefits for the customer. So that’s kind of like the ROI based approach. But you still need to focus on the relationship so that you’re not just like a resource that the companies use, they just give you money, and you do some service.

Andrej Zito 

And then at some point, some somebody else comes and they can do the same thing for a cheaper price. And then the client, then your client basically has no reason to stick with you because they have no relationships. Of course, of course, you build some relationships over time, especially like if you are doing the project and you do a good quality. But that also means building relationships. So these were my three, like tips. And it’s funny because it’s me giving the tips about sales process to a guy who has 20 plus years of experience in sales. And I’m the guy who probably sucks at sales, or at least I think so. So this was ready it. And the final thing that I wanted to talk about was my favorite link in and I was like, I wasn’t very I wasn’t very active. I wasn’t very, very active. Wait, I’m looking at this lady. Okay, whatever. So I wasn’t very active. Like I didn’t create like a lot of content. And yeah, I was actually I have to confess that I was a little bit procrastinating this week, I did the localization podcast. But after that, I started working on my next kind of like educational video, which will be the review of the power of now book. So it once again won’t be very specific to localization industry. But how did I get off? How did I get here?

Andrej Zito 

Yeah. Let me check.

Andrej Zito 

Para Para, para para para, para para.

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Andrej Zito 

Okay, okay, okay. Okay. Okay. So I think I posted my I promoted my localization podcast four days ago. So was that on Tuesday, I think maybe on Tuesday, so I didn’t choose a day. And according to the history on the same day, I went over the new posts, and there were two that caught my eye and that I reacted with the first one was from Katherine Pierce, and she’s the Chief Financial Officer at venga global. And they posted an article about culture. So this is again, something that I have like a lot of thoughts and ideas about. Although I never studied like anything about HR, I pretty much just think about these things from the perspective of an employee, because I work for so many companies and I think I know what works for me and I know what works for others.

Andrej Zito 

So I think I’m not like totally off when it comes to, like the whole HR and like culture and building culture and what is important and what is not. So they, I really liked the article because it looked like they’re trying new things when it comes to, to managing people. And I think that Vanguard is a lot bigger than, than the global knee. And they mentioned what worked for them. So I’m just briefly going to say they said that slack works for them, I can see definitely this working. And it makes communication much easier. An extra day off. So this is something that I even ask about in her post, because let me just quote the article from their blog, the extra day off was a new initiative that we tried this year, the idea is to work with your team and cover for each other so that every person is able to take an extra day off, paid, of course, then take a picture of what you did on your day off and share with the team on the fun channel in slack.

Andrej Zito 

This gives everyone a chance to learn about hobbies and lives of their teammates and feel more connected. So what I really like this is kind of like the flexibility that it gives to, to the team. Because like if the rest of the team can like pull off, like an extra that are a this is this is the way I understood that it works. If you basically like the whole team has like a certain output that they need to do in like a week or a month. Then basically, they within the team, they should have kind of like a flexibility of who works when as long as the team delivers the the same output within the within the timeframe. And and yeah, I think the most important thing for me is like the flexibility I’m not sure how it works in in reality in practical terms, but um, wait, I even so I had a little interruption because I got a call from landmark.

Andrej Zito 

And they just asked me if I would be part of the assisting program. And it will be assisting during the landmark advanced course with Gigi, and she’s she’s the lady that I had during my advanced course. So I’m really excited because it’s kind of like you get the you get to experience the whole course again, for free. You just have to, you know, assist here and there with like, you know, chairs and cleaning stuff, I assume. So. It’s like a pretty good ROI. So where was I was talking about the extra, extra day, right? So I talk about the flexibility that it gives, I think, yeah, I think last time I so let me find my Yeah, my question was, and I asked this in, in my comment on LinkedIn. extra day off, do you have any hard cap on this per person in a month or week? How does it work practically, let’s say a team of five, one person takes a day off the other four put an extra two hours, then it rotates.

Andrej Zito 

So in the end, the team output is the same. And Katrin replied to me. We didn’t have rules in place for the extra day, the team, salaried staff and permanent contractors alike needed to come together and figure it out. The idea was not that someone asks for an extra day when it suits them. But the team offered to support them for an extra day when they could cover. This doesn’t make that much sense. The idea was that not not it was not that someone asked for an extra day. But the team offered to support them. I don’t know like from the reply, it seems to me like the team offers to support them for an extra day. Like how would you How would you like if you’re a team How would you actually decide like who you’re going to support for an extra day? I don’t know.

Andrej Zito 

I don’t see any kind of Maybe I think I’d like to in a very structured way, or rule based week. But yeah, whatever. Okay, let’s, let’s just move on, let’s just move on. Next one, that company clarity. So that’s the same thing like communicate about what the company is doing what the company is heading shoutouts. So this is recognizing how much our employees contribute to the culture. Now, this is interesting when the five minute intro videos, and they said it was marginally successful. So what they tried to do was that when they had a new hire, because they’re like a big company across the globe, that every new employee would do like a five minute intro video. And that would be shared across the company. And they said that like, not every making videos is like nuts for everyone.

Andrej Zito 

And not everybody’s willing to participate, which I definitely have to agree with. Like, it’s not for everyone, you know, to get in front of the video and say something, like, I struggled like with it like a lot. And even though I have my own YouTube channel, now, and I get in front of the camera, it’s really much about the experience and getting used to it. Because before that, like I really hate it, like when I had to look at myself or other people were like taking pictures of me and stuff like that. So now I wouldn’t have probably a problem with it, you know, to get in front of the camera and just introduce myself, like the whole company, but like I can see definitely that many people would be against this travel. This is another part that they mentioned in their blog post, and that, that they found success with this. And people travel for training, working remotely.

Andrej Zito 

And they participate in and they participate in events. Listening to our employees very successful, of course, that’s important. And that was it. So that was the first post that caught my attention on LinkedIn. And the second one was from our dear Moravia, and that is where I started my career. And this guy, Josh Peterson. I don’t know what is his like title, but his headline on Lincoln says delivering global growth through customized solutions. I guess he’s like some, he’s either like a marketing guy, or he’s a sales guy or something like that. And they posted this nice deck, and it was part of LinkedIn. So I didn’t have to open anything. And it was about five ways to optimize user experience for your international audience. And this is actually the reason why I reflect this is that it was the first time that I saw someone talking about localizing user experience and doing real like real testing.

Andrej Zito 

And I’m just browsing through the through the slides. And basically, their whole idea was that okay, like you have like an English or let’s say source content, and you have like your call to action buttons, or the weights positions or the color or to websites. And you have no idea if this is if this user experience will be the ideal one for for different markets. And so they were basically saying that you need to test everything and testing data and deeply dive into the why. Heat mapping seeing the big picture, work with experts, so that’s when they start selling, especially when you’re translating or at best trance creating like marketing copy, especially like headlines. stuff like that, like, how do you actually know that? The translator or then the editor or reviewer who has like the final say in it, that they actually know what’s the best headline, you know, you don’t know.

Andrej Zito 

So ideally, you will not kind of like a B test different versions of headline translations. And it’s actually funny because like, when I was actually I’m going to take credit for that is when I was applying for a job with Optimizely, which is like, I think the number one solution for a B testing. And I was applying for the position of localization director, and I totally blew it. But because I was like, so excited about the opportunity, I can like create a kind of like this, like, proposal, like what I would focus on as the as the localization director. And because I was being interviewed by Optimizely, and I don’t think I ever heard about a B testing before that the first thing that came to my mind was that we should have something like a B, localization or something like that.

Andrej Zito 

And that is basically testing, you know, you let the market the the customers decide which translation is better, because if the translation is better, they will probably interact with it more, like for example, when you have CPAs, or when you have headlines, which are links. So which one has like a better click through rate or which button prompts people to download? or register for something and, and things like that? So, so this slides from Moravia, which is about user experience goes even further, because they’re also talking about like the colors and stuff like that. And I really liked it. I never I never thought of that before. And I have never seen anyone before talk about UX localization. So this to me was something new to think about. And you guys, should you guys should think about it as well.

Andrej Zito 

Well, it’s 840. I think I’m talking for Yeah, no, it’s one hour. So my throat is really drained out. And I am starting to cough again. And I want to leave soon because I’m going for, for for a dance in a club. So I think I covered everything that I wanted to. I don’t think I’ll do the editing now. So I’ll probably do the editing tomorrow. So that I can leave soon. And yet that will be it. So the most important thing in this episode was a virtual assistants that handle the communication, managing orders managing stock payments automatically in different languages. Second thing is UX localization. That was definitely something new. And the third one was about sales process. And the fourth one was about culture, and some of my insights. Well, I hope you enjoyed this episode, my dear friends of localization. And I’m going to sign off now and enjoy your week and I’ll talk to you next week. Bye. Boom.

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